CMT/CAPT PREP

 

5th Grade Plan:

 

Sep-Oct: Teachers instructed to do  Part One of Measuring Time Kit on Moon Phases. One kit sent per school, teachers to share

Oct 1: 3 Hour PD for all fifth grade teachers on UNH Sound Unit

Nov 26: Sound Unit Materials delivered, one to each of 65 classrooms.

Dec: Teachers instruct Sound Unit

 

Dec: 2 GEMS kits on light delivered, one to each classroom: Color Analyzers, More Than Magnifiers

Jan: Teachers instruct Light Units

Jan 7,8: 4 Half Day PD for ALL fifth teachers on Curr units, inquiry and test prep

 

Feb: Teachers instruct Senses Unit, Do Catch It! Embedded Task (ruler).

Late Feb: Full Court Press Science: Sample inquiry labs, test questions

Curriculum and Assessment Includes Inquiry Skills Tasks, Practice

March: CMT

 

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8th Grade Plan:

Curriculum and Quarterly Assessment Includes Inquiry Skills Tasks, Practice

(Some Materials sent to Title I Schools in June 2007)

 

Sep-Oct: Bridges Unit with Significant Tasks, CMT Like First Quarter Assessment

Oct-Nov: Motion, Forces Unit: Slipping and Sliding Embedded Task

 

Dec-Jan: Circular Motion, Moon, Earth, Seasons Unit Second Quarter Assessments

 

Jan-Feb: Earth Science Unit: Glaciers, Erosion, Plate Tectonics

 

Late Feb: Full Court Press Science: Sample inquiry labs, test questions

March: CMT

 

NOTE: 7th Grade has a FULL Schedule of curriculum units to be on test

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Format of the Elementary Science CMT - Grade 5

Item Distribution

 

Content Knowledge

Scientific Inquiry, Literacy and Numeracy

 

Selected Response*

Constructed

Response*

Selected Response*

Total Points

Life Science

6

1

6

14

Physical Science

6

1

6

14

Earth Science

6

1

6

14

Total Points

24

18

42

* Each selected response item is worth 1 point.  Each constructed response item is worth 2 points.

General Test Format

The Elementary Science CMT is a cumulative test administered at Grade 5.  It includes science knowledge described in the Core Science Curriculum Framework for grades 3, 4, and 5. .  It includes science knowledge described in Framework Expected Performances B.1 through B.25 and science inquiry skills described in BINQ 1 through BINQ 10.  Some of the elementary Inquiry Expected Performances are assessed through district and classroom assessments.  These include BINQ 2, BINQ 7 and BINQ 8.

There are a total of 39 test questions: 36 selected response items and 3 constructed response items. Of the 36 selected response items, 18 assess Content Knowledge and 18 assess processes of Scientific Inquiry, Literacy and Numeracy.  The 3 constructed response items assess Content Knowledge.

Test Scoring

The selected response items are scored electronically as correct or incorrect.  Constructed response items are hand-scored by trained readers using a 3 point scale (0-2).

Curriculum-Embedded Performance Tasks

SDE has developed curriculum-embedded performance tasks related to one Content Standard from Grades 3, 4 and 5.  The performance tasks are posted at www.ct.gov/sde under the curriculum site.  Districts are encouraged to utilize these inquiry investigations when their curricula address the Content Standard related to each task.  The Elementary Science CMT will include two to three Scientific Inquiry, Literacy and Numeracy selected response items related to each of the embedded performance tasks.

Reporting

A Total Science Score will be reported based on all 42 points.  In addition, the following subscores will be reported:

 

·      Life Science                                                           14 points         (33⅓ %)         

·      Physical Science                                                    14 points         (33⅓ %)         

·      Earth Science                                                         14 points         (33⅓ %)         

 

·      Content Knowledge                                              24 points         (57%)

·      Scientific Inquiry, Literacy and Numeracy            18 points         (43%) 

Testing Time - 65 minutes


 

Format of the Middle School Science CMT - Grade 8

Item Distribution

 

Content Knowledge

Scientific Inquiry, Literacy and Numeracy

 

 

Selected Response*

Selected Response*

Constructed Response*

Total Points

Life Science

10

5

1

17

Physical Science

10

5

1

17

Earth Science

10

5

1

17

Total Points

30

21

51

* Each selected response item is worth 1 point.  Each constructed response item is worth 2 points.

General Test Format

The Middle School Science CMT is a cumulative test administered at Grade 8.  It includes science knowledge described in the Core Science Curriculum Framework for grades 6, 7, and 8. .  It includes science knowledge described in Framework Expected Performances C.1 through C.30 and science inquiry skills described in CINQ 1 through CINQ 10.

There are a total of 48 test questions: 45 selected response items and 3 constructed response items. Of the 45 selected response items, 30 assess Content Knowledge and 15 assess processes of Scientific Inquiry, Literacy and Numeracy.  The 3 constructed response items will assess Scientific Inquiry, Literacy and Numeracy in the context of the Grade 6, 7 and 8 Curriculum-Embedded Performance Tasks.

Test Scoring

The selected response items are scored electronically as correct or incorrect.  Constructed response items are hand-scored by trained readers using a 3 point scale (0-2).

Curriculum Embedded Performance Tasks

SDE has developed a performance task related to a Content Standard in Grade 6, 7 and 8. These performance tasks are posted at www.ct.gov/sde under the curriculum site.  Districts are encouraged to utilize these inquiry investigations when their curricula address the Content Standard related to each task.  The Middle School Science CMT will include one Scientific Inquiry, Literacy and Numeracy constructed response item related to each of the three curriculum-embedded performance tasks. 

Reporting

A Total Science Score will be reported based on all 51 points.  In addition, the following subscores will be reported:

 

·      Life Science                                                           17 points         (33⅓ %)         

·      Physical Science                                                    17 points         (33⅓ %)                     

·      Earth Science                                                         17 points         (33⅓ %)

           

·      Content Knowledge                                              30 points         (59 %)                        

·      Scientific Inquiry, Literacy and Numeracy            21 points         (41 %)

 

Testing Time - 70 minutes


WHAT IS A CURRICULUM-EMBEDDED PERFORMANCE TASK?

Curriculum-embedded performance tasks are examples of teaching and learning activities that engage students in using inquiry process skills to deepen their understanding of concepts described in the science framework.  Developed by teachers working with the Connecticut State Department of Education, the performance tasks are intended to influence a constructivist approach to teaching and learning science throughout the school year.  They will also provide a context for CMT questions assessing students’ ability to do scientific inquiry.

The three elementary performance tasks are conceptually related to Content Standards in Grades 3 to 5 and the three middle school performance tasks are related to Content Standards in Grades 6 to 8.  The elementary performance tasks provide opportunities for students to use the Inquiry Expected Performances for Grades 3 to 5 (see Science Framework B.INQ 1-10 skills) to understand science concepts. The middle school performance tasks provide opportunities for students to use the Inquiry Expected Performances for Grades 6 to 8 (see Science Framework C.INQ 1-10 skills) to understand science concepts. 

                                    HOW DOES ______________ affect __________________

 

GRADE 3 Soggy Paper ( How types of paper affect absorption)

GRADE 4 Go With The Flow (Electric Circuits) (How objects affect conductivity)

GRADE 5 Catch It! (How factors affect reaction time)

GRADE 6 DigIn (How factors affect water in soil)

GRADE 7 Feel The Beat (How factors affect hear rate)

GRADE 8 Slipping and Sliding (How factors affect friction)

Teachers are encouraged to use the state-developed curriculum-embedded performance tasks in conjunction with numerous other learning activities that incorporate similar inquiry process skills to deepen understanding of science concepts.  Students who regularly practice and receive feedback on problem-solving and critical thinking skills will steadily gain proficiency.

 

HOW ARE THE PERFORMANCE TASKS STRUCTURED?

Each performance task includes two investigations; one that provides some structure and direction for students, and a second that allows students more opportunity to operate independently. The goal is to gradually increase students’ independent questioning, planning and data analysis skills.  The elementary performance tasks introduce students to understanding and conducting “fair tests”.  The middle school performance tasks focus on designing investigations that test cause/effect relationships by manipulating variables. 

·       Engagement: stimulate students’ interest, curiosity and preconceptions;

·       Exploration: first-hand experiences with concepts without direct instruction;

·       Explanation: students’ explanations followed by introduction of formal terms and clarifications;

·       Elaboration: applying knowledge to solve a problem. Students frequently develop and complete their own well-designed investigations;

·       Evaluation:  students and teachers reflect on change in conceptual understanding and identify ideas still “under development”.

 

 

There are many science investigations that are currently used in schools that provide inquiry learning opportunities similar to those illustrated in the performance tasks.  Students need a variety of classroom experiences to deepen their understanding of a science concept and to become proficient in using scientific processes, analysis and communication.  Teachers are encouraged to use the state-developed curriculum-embedded performance tasks in conjunction with numerous other learning activities that incorporate similar inquiry processes and critical thinking skills.

 

HOW ARE THE PERFORMANCE TASKS RELATED TO THE CMT?

The new Science CMT for Grades 5 and 8 will assess students’ understanding of inquiry and the nature of science through questions framed within the CONTEXT of the curriculum-embedded performance tasks.  Students are not expected to recall the SPECIFIC DETAILS OR THE “RIGHT” ANSWER to any performance task.  The questions, similar to the examples shown below, will assess students’ general understandings of scientific observations, investigable questions, designing “fair tests”, making evidence-based conclusions and judging experimental quality.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Some students did an experiment to find out which type of paper holds the most water.  They followed these steps:

 

  1. Fill a container with 25 milliliters of water.
  2. Dip pieces of paper towel into the water until all the water is absorbed.
  3. Count how many pieces of paper towel were used to absorb all the water.
  4. Repeat with tissues and napkins.

 

If another group of students wanted to repeat this experiment, which information would be most important for them to know?

a.     The size of the water container

b.     The size of the paper pieces *

c.     When the experiment was done

d.     How many students were in the group

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Imagine that you want to do a pulse rate experiment to enter in the school science fair.  You’ve decided to investigate whether listening to different kinds of music affects people’s pulse rate. 

 

Write a step-by-step procedure you could use to collect reliable data related to your question.  Include enough detail so that someone else could conduct the same experiment and get similar results


CURRICULUM

 

The new science curriculum overview includes a vision and philosophy of science for all students, instructional and assessment guidelines and strategies, and an overview pacing guide.

http://nhps.net/curriculum/science/sciencecurroverview.doc

 

The New Haven Science standards, expectations, and pacing guide:

http://nhps.net/curriculum/science/nhpsdraftscience.doc

 

The CT State Grade Level Expectations (draft) explain important concepts for

K-5  http://nhps.net/curriculum/science/K-5ScienceGLEs.doc

 

and

6-8  http://nhps.net/curriculum/science/6-8MSScienceGLEs.doc

 

There are also two part investigations, with teacher guides and student questions for each grade, called Embedded Tasks. They must be completed with each student, since there will be CMT test questions about each.

http://nhps.net/curriculum/science/NewCTStateScience/NewCTStateScience.htm

3rd grade: Soggy paper

4th Grade: Go With The Flow (Circuits)

5th grade: Catch It

6th grade: Dig In

7th grade: Feel The beat

8th grade: Shipping and Sliding

 

We have new curriculum units for grades K-3 and 7-8. draft units for 4, 5, and 6 based on work done at UNH this summer and being piloted now.

Curriculum guides, units found at:

http://nhps.net/curriculum/science/  or www.newhavenscience.org

 

Grades K-4 units can be rotated through the year, depending on kit availability.

Grade 5, 7-8 units have a specific order

 

**

For grade 5 this year, we are rolling out the new materials in order:

Fifth grade teachers should have first done the first half of the Measuring Time STC kit on moon phases. Next the Sound unit, based on the Oct 1 training. Light Unit materials to be used in the winter, and the Senses unit, including the CatchIt embedded task all to be done before March.

 

See science certification guide at:

http://nhps.net/curriculum/science/NHPSSciCert.htm

 

Summaries of all professional development at http://www.newhavenscience.org

 

http://nhps.net/curriculum/science/scimaterials.htm

 


 

SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN

2007 – 20___

GOAL: To improve/gain on inquiry portion of CT Science Standardized tests: Grade 5, 8 CMT,up to 50%

(15% gain on concept score on CAPT Test)

OBJECTIVE:

 

Identified Need(s)

 

 

Tier 2 Indicators

Strategies

How will we monitor and provide evidence of implementation and effectiveness?

Additional Skills, Knowledge and Support Needed

 Provide disaggregated student achievement data

 

Inquriy Score from CASAP (2005),

Average of CMT Writing, Reading, Math Scores (for Grade 5)

Average Inquiry Score for 7-11 2006-2007 Science Quarterly Assessments

Average Inquiry Score for 2007 CAPT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Identify adult actions that will impact student achievement

Provide inquiry type labs, and follow up questions

Provide materials for labs

Provide time during school day for inquiry science

Instruct on inquiry skills

Provide monitoring, assessment, PD.

New Strategies:

Practice of embedded tasks/inquiry labs , with follow up class discussion on inquiry questions, followed by writing practice.

Practice assessments

 

 

 

 

 

Continuation Strategies:

Inquiry type labs: STC Kits, open ended CAPT style experiments

Principal/Designee Will:

Check on use of kits/inquiry labs provided

Review quarterly assessment data/CAPT data with grade/subject level teams

 

 

 

 

Teacher/ Coaches will:

Keep records of student progess on inquiry questions/follow up

Review quarterly assessment data/CAPT data with grade/subject level teams

 

Provide all staff with professional development in and for:

Inquiry Skills, follow up with class discussion and writing: Grade 5 in January (Science Supervisor)

Grades 8-10 at CIA (Science Supervisor)

 


 

COMPREHENSIVE SCHOOL PLAN ACCOUNTABILITY SHEET

 

GOAL: To improve/gain on inquiry portion of CT Science Standardized tests: Grade 5, 8 CMT,up to 50%

(15% gain on concept score on CAPT Test), shown by 15% improvement Quarter 1 – Quarter 4 for quarterly assessments

MEASUREMENT TOOL

BASELINE DATA

TARGET

ACTUAL

STATUS

 

 

Dec.

Feb.

May

Dec.

Feb.

May

Dec.

Feb.

May

Quarterly Assessments Grades 7-12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Average Score from 2006-2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

                                                 

 

 

 

 

 

New Haven Public Schools

 

 

               SCIENCE

 

          CURRICULUM

         

          OVERVIEW

 


New Haven Public Schools     Science Curriculum Vision

 

SCIENCE IS FOR ALL STUDENTS

All students, regardless of age, sex, cultural or ethnic background, disabilities, aspirations, or interest and motivation in science, should have the opportunity to attain high levels of scientific literacy.  Excellence in science education embodies the ideal that all students can achieve understanding of science if they are given the opportunity.  Our goal is to ensure that all students at all levels achieve science literacy, for science is the key to their future.

 

SCIENCE LITERACY

Science literacy is a combination of understanding major science concepts and theories, using scientific reasoning, and recognizing the complex interactions between science, technology and society.  Scientific literacy requires the ability to apply critical thinking skills when dealing with science-related issues.  A scientifically literate person is able to transfer knowledge of the academic theories and principles of science to practical applications in the real world.  Scientific literacy also implies having the capacity to pose and evaluate arguments based on evidence and to apply logical conclusions from such arguments.  Scientific literacy means that a person can ask, find, or determine answers to questions derived from curiosity about everyday experiences.  It means that a person has the ability to describe, explain, and predict natural phenomena.  Scientific literacy entails being able to read with understanding articles about science in the popular press and to engage in social conversation about the validity of the conclusions.  Scientific literacy implies that a person can identify scientific issues underlying national and local decisions and express positions that are scientifically and technologically informed.

 

LEARNING SCIENCE IS AN ACTIVE PROCESS

Learning science is something students do, not something that is done to them.  In learning science, students describe objects and events, ask questions, acquire knowledge, construct explanations of natural phenomena, test those explanations in many different ways, and communicate their ideas to others.  This term “active process” implies physical and mental activity.  Hands-on activities are not enough—students also must have “minds-on” experiences.  Science teaching must involve students in inquiry-oriented investigations in which they interact with their teachers and peers.  Students establish connections between their current knowledge of science and the scientific knowledge found in many sources; they apply science content to new questions; they engage in problem solving, planning, decision making, and group discussions; and they experience assessments that are consistent with an active approach to learning.  Emphasizing active science learning means shifting emphasis away from teachers presenting information and “covering” science topics.  The perceived need to include all the topics, vocabulary, and information in textbooks is in direct conflict with the central goal of having students learn scientific knowledge with understanding. Inquiry into authentic questions generated from student experiences is the central strategy for teaching science.

 

TEACHERS OF SCIENCE GUIDE AND FACILITATE LEARNING  In doing this, teachers:

-Display and demand respect for the diverse ideas, skills, and experiences of all students.

-Focus and support inquiries while interacting with students.

-Encourage, model, and emphasize the skills, attitudes, and values of scientific inquiry, as well as the curiosity, openness to new ideas and data, and skepticism that characterize science.

-Orchestrate discourse and ongoing discussion among students about scientific ideas.

-Challenge students to accept and share responsibility for their own learning and the learning of all members of the community.

-Recognize and respond to student diversity and encourage all students to participate fully in science learning

-Enable students to have a significant voice in decisions about the content and context of their work.

-Nurture collaboration among students.


 

SCIENCE INSTRUCTION

 Science uses instructional strategies and resources to promote thinking about the content, and students are encouraged to critically discuss ideas, seek information, and validate explanations. 

 

Concepts:                    The overall instructional strategy for teaching science skills and concepts is that of learning by doing.  Abstract concepts in science are explained in class using diagrams, models, simulations, and a variety of media.  Students take notes in class, and participate in class discussions.  There are questions asked of the students daily, both written and oral, that ask them to explain concepts and relate scientific behavior to real life phenomena.  The teacher models the use of quantitative and qualitative analysis through some problem solving strategies in class, which the students then practice, both in groups and individually.

 

 Labs/Activities:          In each unit of study, students participate in laboratory investigations at least once a week.  The lab investigations are sometimes set procedures in which the students practice the skills of observation, measurement, and data analysis.  Many other lab experiences ask the students to design their own safe experiment: formulating hypothesis, controlling variables, and communicating and explaining their results and conclusions.  The lab experiences directly relate to the concepts as well as show real life applications of science concepts.  Students explore phenomena and collect empirical evidence to support their own explanations. 

 

Real Life:                    Students apply the knowledge they have learned by using science concepts to make decisions about current issues in each unit.  They write persuasive essays, conduct collaborative and independent research, and participate in forums and debates.  The students are expected to synthesize information from various resources and construct carefully reasoned opinions about the issue.  There are case studies and simulations that require students to learn and apply their science knowledge and make judgments.           

 

The emphasis in all the instructional activities is to promote higher order thinking skills and making connections.  Students learn how to use resources, rather than memorizing many facts, and apply their laboratory experiences to other situations.

 

 

A useful structure for inquiry-based learning units follows a LEARNING CYCLE model.  One such model, the “5-E Model”, engages students in experiences that allow them to observe, question and make tentative explanations before formal instruction and terminology is introduced.  Generally, there are five stages in an inquiry-learning unit: 

 

Engagement: stimulate students’ interest, curiosity, and preconceptions.

Exploration: first-hand experiences with concepts without direct instruction;

Explanation: students’ explanations followed by introduction of formal terms and clarifications;

Elaboration: applying knowledge to solve a problem.  Students frequently develop and complete their own well-designed investigations.

Evaluation:  students and teachers reflect on change in conceptual understanding and identify ideas still “under development”.

 


KEY RESEARCH BASED SCIENCE INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

(Strategies adopted from Marzano, Journal of Research in Science Education, others)

 

-Create a Climate for Learning: well planned lessons, positive teacher attitude, safe, secure, enriching environment.

 

-Follow a Guided Inquiry Learning Cycle Modelŕ Open Ended Inquiry: Guided Inquiry into a teacher posed question by students leads to students investigating their own questions.

 

-Generating and Testing Hypotheses: students given the opportunity to investigate their ideas.

 

-Setting Objectives/Providing Feedback: Objectives are always clear for all class activities, students always know how they are meeting objectives.

 

-Use Warm Up Activities, Questions, Cues, Advance Organizers: Starter questions generate interest, cue students as to learning activities, and provide a reference throughout a lesson

 

-Assess Prior Knowledge/Misconceptions: Students have to construct their internal model of science concepts and reconcile it with previous experience, often leading to hard to overcome misconceptions. 

 

-Self-Explanation/Discussion: Students given the opportunity to explain and discuss ideas are better able to connect prior and new knowledge and experiences.

 

-Opportunities to Communicate/Cooperative Learning: Science is a group endeavor, as is it’s learning.  Students learn best by communicating and learning from each other.

 

-Vary the Way Students Work: Lab groups, learning centers, projects, and other alternatives to traditional lecture allow for individualized instruction.

 

-Practice Effective Questioning Techniques: Questions are the tool to move towards a student-centered classroom, and different types of questions help guide instruction and learning.

 

-Vary the Structure of Lessons, Use Research Based Strategies: Lesson structure depends on the concepts and skills being learned and assessed.  Brain based research in learning points to specific effective varying structures.

 

-Identify Similarities and Differences/Graphic Organizers: Science concepts are often organized into structures by humans attempting to understand nature.  Help students understand the classification and organization of knowledge by continually comparing, classifying, as well as describing analogies and relationships.

 

-Scaffolded Writing Practice: Students can move from oral explanation to written explanation through careful guidance/practice, including both expository and persuasive writing in science.

 

-Strengthen Comprehension for Content Area Reading Text: provide guided focus question, organizers, response and discussion questions, summarize, evaluative prompts based on reading.

 

-Non-Linguistic Representations: Models, drawings, and pictures all can help understand science.

 

-Allow Opportunities for Peer Review: Students are frequently asked to evaluate others’ work on standardized testing and must be given regular opportunities as part of their science experience.

 

-Create and Embed Science, Technology and Society (STS), issues, and other items relevant to students’ lives.  These interdisciplinary learning activities are designed to engage students in the applications of science using their critical thinking skills and content knowledge.  They afford students the opportunity to examine ideas and data related to historical, technological, and/or social aspects of science concepts and content.

 


ASSESSMENT:

 

Assessment Strategies:

Students are assessed with a variety of methods on their knowledge of science concepts and skills and how they apply to the real world. 

 

Diagnostic assessment can be used to determine the learning needs of students.

Formative assessment can be used during instruction in order to guide students and increase learning.  Summative assessments are used to identify achievement of goals and objectives.

 

Daily classwork and homework is used to check for understanding of main ideas and application of the techniques and skills of science.  These daily assessment tools include a mixture of written explanations, diagrams, model building, and problem solving.  Students are assessed on their laboratory skills using rubrics and class monitoring.  Students are assessed on their ability to explain unit-related concepts and their conclusions on experimentation results by written lab reports, written explanations on quizzes and tests, as well as occasional oral explanation of laboratory ideas and procedures. 

 

There are periodic unit quizzes and tests, which assess students’ skills and knowledge in a similar manner to their daily instructional activities.  The written quizzes and tests include a mixture of knowledge and comprehension questions, as well as questions which require students to demonstrate knowledge of inquiry skills, explanation of concepts, as well as making connections to other concepts and everyday experiences.  The assessment tools include questions about cause and effect, steps of scientific processes, and explanation of phenomena, and are not focused on just vocabulary and word problem solving.  Tests and quizzes, as well as midterm and final exams, may include a lab performance component. 

 

Students are assessed on their ability to explain science ideas, do research, and defend decisions about scientific issues by the use of projects and class simulations.  Projects require some level of judgment and thinking by the students and extend beyond research into analysis and synthesis.  Group and interpersonal skills are included.  Rubrics detailing students’ ability to present, discuss, and use scientific research, both lab results and issues, are used by students, peers, and the teacher.


SCIENCE CURRICULUM MODEL:

 

Each science grade K-6, and each science course 7-12, follows the essential same format, and is linked in content, skills, and format to the CT State Science Frameworks, standardized test guidelines, and Grade Level Expectations. Revised versions and update found at www.newhavenscience.org

The state of Connecticut has published State Science Frameworks, which have specific content standards, in four units per grade level K-10, as well as 9-10 overall skill/inquiry standards.  Further unwrapping has produced specific performance expectation standards (10-18) per grade level, and a further 10-20 list of specific grade level concept expectations per unit.  There is one CT state required embedded performance task in grades 3-8, and 10 in grades 9-10.  Currently, standardized testing is conducted in grades 5, 8, and 10, each testing students’ knowledge and skills on science content in previous grades.

 

For New Haven Public Schools:

Each science course/grade  has:

 

-Overview and Pacing Guide

 

-Course Goals/ Objectives

 

UNIT:

Each unit, 4 units in grades K-6, and 7 units each year in grades 7-12 have the format:

 

-Unit Goal/Introduction Description/Essential Question

 

-Power Standards, link to applicable CT State Performance Expectations.

 

-Essential Concepts/ Essential Skills: The essential content and concepts for each unit, leading to the unit standards.  Linked to CT State Grade Level Expectations where available.

 

-Science Misconceptions: linked to essential concepts, based on research

 

-Essential Vocabulary:  To be used as a guide for teachers.

 

-Outline of Suggested Sequence of Instructional Activities: In each unit, some activities are references, and some are required. Links to some teacher and student templates are provided.

 

-Reading for Information Piece In some 7-12 units, a suggested reading for information piece is provided.

 

-Significant Task: A learning activity that addresses the essential power standard and concepts of the units.  Student and teacher materials are provided, along with assessment tools.

 

-Suggested Assessments: Other suggested assessment tools

 

-Resources: A list of unit related resources, websites, and activities.  This will be constantly edited and revised as feedback is given.

 

-Quarterly Assessments: In grades 7-12, district wide quarterly assessments are given in science courses, focusing on skills and concepts to be found on CT standardized tests and are required.


 

 

New Haven Public Schools

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEW HAVEN SCHOOLS

SCIENCE STANDARDS FOR 2007-2008

PACING GUIDE/ CURRENT USE/ EMBEDDED TASKS

SUBJECT TO REVISION

 

 

 

Richard Therrien

 

K-12 Science Supervisor

New Haven Schools

54 Meadow Street, 3rd Floor

New Haven, CT 06519

 

Phone: 203-946-7933

 

Fax:    203-946-8664

 

richard.therrien@new-haven.k12.ct.us

 

www.newhavenscience.org


NEW HAVEN PUBLIC SCHOOLS SCIENCE CONTENT OUTLINE 2007-2008    www.newhavenscience.org

(Note, K-6 content order subject to change and is dependent on kit supply and school specific rotation)

 

Quarter One

 

Quarter Two

Quarter

Three

Quarter Four

 

K

Weather

 

Object Properties

Seasons

Living Things:

characteristics

 

1

Compare/ Contrast Measurement

 

Motion

 

Light Properties

Living Things: Structure

 

2

Solids/Liquids

 

Soil

 

Nutrition

Animal Life Cycles

 

3

Rocks

 

Material Properties *ET

 

Recycling/ Conservation

Plant Life Cycles

 

4

Force and Motion

 

Ecosystems

 

Water

Electricity *ET

 

5

Sound

Light and Color

Light and Uses (Lenses)

Senses *ET

Sun, Earth, Moon

(CMT TEST FOLLOWS)

Health Topics

 

6

Ecosystem Populations

 

Weather Systems

 

Water Resources *ET

Simple Machines

 

7

Properties of Matter

Chemical Properties

Cells

Genetics/

Reproduction

Life Systems Musculo-Skeletal

Life Systems Biochemical *ET

Microbes/

Food Preservation

8

Forces/Bridges

Forces/

Motion *ET

Solar System Motion

Landforms/Earth Forces

Tectonic Plates (CMT TEST FOLLOWS)

Rock Cycle

Natural Disasters

9

PhyChem

Heat/Phase Changes

Atoms/

Bonding *ET

Polymers *ET

Earth chemical cycles *ET

Earth Materials/

Environment Impact *ET

Energy/

Electricity *ET

Energy Sources/

Impacts *ET

10 Bio

BioChemistry *ET

Cells/

Bacteria/

Viruses *ET

Heredity/

Genetics *ET

Evolution

Diseases/

Populations *ET

(CAPT TEST FOLLOWS)

Organism Interdependence

Organism Behavior/

Structure

11 Chem

Chemical Properties

Atomic Structure

Nuclear

Compounds/

Bonding

Reactions/

Equations

Gas Behavior

Organic Chemistry

12 Physics

Motion

ACCEL

2 D Motion

Forces/Work

Energy/Electric

Wave/Sound/Light

Mod Physics

*ET = CT Embedded Task,  NHPS District Unit Tasks and Quarterly Assessments Also Required Grades 7-12,

New Haven City Wide Science Fair May 13, 14, 15th


THE STANDARDS FOR SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY, LITERACY AND NUMERACY ARE INTEGRAL PARTS OF THE CONTENT STANDARDS FOR EACH GRADE LEVEL IN THIS CLUSTER.

Grades PreK-2 Core Scientific Inquiry, Literacy and Numeracy

How is scientific knowledge created and communicated?

Content Standards

Expected Performances

SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY

¨     Scientific inquiry is a thoughtful and coordinated attempt to search out, describe, explain and predict natural phenomena.

 

SCIENTIFIC LITERACY

¨     Scientific literacy includes speaking, listening, presenting, interpreting, reading and writing about science.

 

SCIENTIFIC NUMERACY 

¨     Mathematics provides useful tools for the description, analysis and presentation of scientific data and ideas.

A INQ.1     Make observations and ask questions about objects, organisms and the environment.

A INQ.2     Use senses and simple measuring tools to collect data.

A INQ.3     Make predictions based on observed patterns.

A INQ.4     Read, write, listen and speak about observations of the natural world.

A INQ.5     Seek information in books, magazines and pictures.

A INQ.6     Present information in words and drawings.

A INQ.7     Use standard tools to measure and describe physical properties such as weight, length and temperature.

A INQ.8     Use nonstandard measures to estimate and compare the sizes of objects.

A INQ.9     Count, order and sort objects by their properties.

A INQ.10  Represent information in bar graphs.

 

 


 

PreK-Kindergarten

Core Themes, Content Standards and Expected Performances

Content Standards

Expected Performances

  • Energy in the Earth’s Systems – How do external and internal sources of energy affect the Earth’s systems? (EARTH)

·       K.3 - Weather conditions vary daily and seasonally.

  • Daily and seasonal weather conditions affect what we do, what we wear and how we feel.

A7 Describe and record daily weather conditions.

A8 Relate seasonal weather patterns to appropriate choices of clothing and activities.

STC Weather

  • Properties of Matter – How does the structure of matter affect the properties and uses of materials? (PHYSICAL)

·       K.1 - Objects have properties that can be observed and used to describe similarities and differences.

  • Some properties can be observed with the senses, and others can be discovered by using simple tools or tests.

A1 Use the senses and simple measuring tools, such as rulers and equal-arm balances, to observe common objects and sort them into groups based on size, weight, shape or color.

A2 Sort objects made of materials such as wood, paper and metal into groups based on properties such as flexibility, attraction to magnets, and whether they float or sink in water.

A3 Count objects in a group and use mathematical terms to describe quantitative relationships such as: same as, more than, less than, equal, etc.

  • Science and Technology in Society – How do science and technology affect the quality of our lives? (PHYSICAL)

·       K.4 - Some objects are natural, while others have been designed and made by people to improve the quality of life.

  • Humans select both natural and man-made materials to build shelters based on local climate conditions, properties of the materials and their availability in the environment.

A9 Describe the types of materials used by people to build houses, and the properties that make the materials useful.

CURRENT FOSS KIT: WOOD

 

  • Heredity and Evolution – What processes are responsible for life’s unity and diversity?(BIO)

·       K.2 - Many different kinds of living things inhabit the Earth.

  • Living things have certain characteristics that distinguish them from nonliving things, including growth, movement, reproduction and response to stimuli.

A4 Describe the similarities and differences in the appearance and behaviors of plants, birds, fish, insects and mammals (including humans).

A5 Describe the similarities and differences in the appearance and behaviors of adults and their offspring.

A6 Describe characteristics that distinguish living from nonliving things.

CURRENT FOSS KIT: TREE


 

Grade 1

Core Themes, Content Standards and Expected Performances                                      

Content Standards

Expected Performances

  • Science and Technology in Society – How do science and technology affect the quality of our lives? (PHYSICAL)

·       1.4 - The properties of materials and organisms can be described more accurately through the use of standard measuring units.

  • Various tools can be used to measure, describe and compare different objects and organisms.

 

A17 Estimate, measure and compare the sizes and weights of different objects and organisms using standard and nonstandard measuring tools.

 

STC KIT: COMPARING/MEASURING

  • Forces and Motion – What makes objects move the way they do? (PHYSICAL)

1.1 -The sun appears to move across the sky in the same way every day, but its path changes gradually over the seasons.

  • An object’s position can be described by locating it relative to another object or the background.
  • An object’s motion can be described by tracing and measuring its position over time.

A10 Describe how the motion of objects can be changed by pushing and pulling.

A11 Describe the apparent movement of the sun across the sky and the changes in the length and direction of shadows during the day.

DSM Force Motion

DSM Sun Shadow

  • Structure and Function – How are organisms structured to ensure efficiency and survival?(BIO)

·       1.2 - Living things have different structures and behaviors that allow them to meet their basic needs.

  • Animals need air, water and food to survive. 
  • Plants need air, water and sunlight to survive.

 

A12 Describe the different ways that animals, including humans, obtain water and food.

A13 Describe the different structures plants have for obtaining water and sunlight.

A14 Describe the structures that animals, including humans, use to move around.

STC Organism


 

Grade 2

         Core Themes, Content Standards and Expected Performances (subject to rotation order)      

Content Standards

Expected Performances

Properties of Matter – How does the structure of matter affect the properties and uses of materials? (PHY)

2.1 - Materials can be classified as solid, liquid or gas based on their observable properties.

Solids tend to maintain their own shapes, while liquids tend to assume the shapes of their containers, and gases fill their containers fully.

 

  A18 Describe differences in the physical properties of solids and liquids.

STC: Solid/Liquid

The Changing Earth – How do materials cycle through the Earth’s systems? (EARTH)

2.3 - Earth materials have varied physical properties which make them useful in different ways.

Soils can be described by their color, texture and capacity to retain water.

Soils support the growth of many kinds of plants, including those in our food supply.

 

A21 Sort different soils by properties, such as particle size, color and composition.

A22 Relate the properties of different soils to their capacity to retain water and support the growth of certain plants.

STC: Soil

Science and Technology in Society – How do science and technology affect the quality of our lives? (BIO)

2.4 - Human beings, like all other living things, have special nutritional needs for survival.

The essential components of balanced nutrition can be obtained from plant and animal sources.

People eat different foods in order to satisfy  nutritional needs for carbohydrates, proteins and fats.

 

 

A23 Identify the sources of common foods and classify them by their basic food groups.

A24 Describe how people in different cultures use different food sources to meet their nutritional needs.

 

Structure and Function – How are organisms   structured to ensure efficiency and survival? (BIO

1.3 - Organisms change in form and behavior as part of their life cycles.

Some organisms undergo metamorphosis during their life cycles; other organisms grow and change, but their basic form stays essentially the same.

A15 Describe the changes in organisms, such as frogs and butterflies, as they undergo metamorphosis.

A16 Describe the life cycles of organisms that grow but do not metamorphose.

Butterflies

 


THE STANDARDS FOR SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY, LITERACY AND NUMERACY ARE INTEGRAL PARTS OF THE CONTENT STANDARDS FOR EACH GRADE LEVEL IN THIS CLUSTER.

Grades 3-5 Core Scientific Inquiry, Literacy and Numeracy

                                         How is scientific knowledge created and communicated?                           

Content Standards

Expected Performances

SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY

¨     Scientific inquiry is a thoughtful and coordinated attempt to search out, describe, explain and predict natural phenomena.

 

SCIENTIFIC LITERACY

¨     Scientific literacy includes speaking, listening, presenting, interpreting, reading and writing about science.

 

SCIENTIFIC NUMERACY

¨     Mathematics provides useful tools for the description, analysis and presentation of scientific data and ideas.

B INQ.1         Make observations and ask questions about objects, organisms and the environment.

B INQ.2         Seek relevant information in books, magazines and electronic media.

B INQ.3         Design and conduct simple investigations.

B INQ.4         Employ simple equipment and measuring tools to gather data and extend the senses.

B INQ.5         Use data to construct reasonable explanations.

B INQ.6         Analyze, critique and communicate investigations using words, graphs and drawings.

B INQ.7         Read and write a variety of science-related fiction and nonfiction texts.

B INQ.8         Search the Web and locate relevant science information.

B INQ.9         Use measurement tools and standard units (e.g., centimeters, meters, grams, kilograms) to describe objects and materials.

B INQ.10      Use mathematics to analyze, interpret and present data.


 

Grade 3

Core Themes, Content Standards and Expected Performances

Content Standards

Expected Performances

The Changing Earth – How do materials cycle through the Earth’s systems?(EARTH)

3.3 - Earth materials have different physical and chemical properties.

Rocks and minerals have properties that may be identified through observation and testing; these properties determine how earth materials are used.

 B5 -Describe the physical properties of rocks and relate them to their potential uses.

B6 -Relate the properties of rocks to the possible environmental conditions during their formation.

KIT : ROCKS/MINERALS

Properties of Matter – How does the structure of matter affect the properties and uses of materials? (PHYS)

3.1 - Materials have properties that can be identified and described through the use of simple tests.

¨     Heating and cooling cause changes in some of the properties of materials.

 

B1 -Sort and classify materials based on properties such as dissolving in water, sinking and floating, conducting heat, and attracting to magnets.

B2 -Describe the effect of heating on the melting, evaporation, condensation and freezing of water.

STC KIT: CHEMICAL TESTS

Science and Technology in Society – How do science and technology affect the quality of our lives? (EARTH)

3.4 - Earth materials provide resources for all living things, but these resources are limited and should be conserved.

Decisions made by individuals can impact the global supply of many resources.

B7 Describe how earth materials can be conserved by reducing the quantities used, and by reusing and recycling materials rather than discarding them.

 

REQUIRED CMT EMBEDDED TASK: SOGGY PAPER

Heredity and Evolution – What processes are responsible for life’s unity and diversity? (BIO)

3.2 - Organisms can survive and reproduce only in environments that meet their basic needs.

¨     Plants and animals have structures and behaviors that help them survive in different environments.

 

B3 -Describe how different plants and animals are adapted to obtain air, water, food and protection in specific land habitats.

B4 -Describe how different plants and animals are adapted to obtain air, water, food and protection in water habitats.

 

Structure and Function – How are organisms structured to ensure efficiency and survival? (BIO)

2.2 - Plants change their form as part of their life cycles.

The life cycles of flowering plants include seed germination, growth, flowering, pollination and seed dispersal.

A 19 -Describe the life cycles of flowering plants as they grow from seeds, proceed through maturation and produce new seeds.

A20 - Explore and describe the effects of light and water on seed germination and plant growth.

 STC KIT: PLANT GROWTH


 

Grade 4

                              Core Themes, Content Standards and Expected Performances              

Content Standards

Expected Performances

Forces and Motion – What makes objects move the way they do? (PHYS)

4.1 - The position and motion of objects can be changed by pushing or pulling.

¨     The size of the change in an object’s motion is related to the strength of the push or pull.

¨     The more massive an object is, the less effect a given force will have on its motion.

 

B8 - Describe the effects of the strengths of pushes and pulls on the motion of objects.

B9 -Describe the effect of the mass of an object on its motion.

STC KIT: MOTION AND DESIGN

Matter and Energy in Ecosystems – How do matter and energy flow through ecosystems? (BIO)

4.2 - All organisms depend on the living and non-living features of the environment for survival.

¨     When the environment changes, some organisms survive and reproduce, and others die or move to new locations.

 

B10 Describe how animals, directly or indirectly, depend on plants to provide the food and energy they need in order to grow and survive.

B11 Describe how natural phenomena and some human activities may cause changes to habitats and their inhabitants. 

STC KIT: ECOSYSTEMS

Energy in the Earth’s Systems – How do external and internal sources of energy affect the Earth’s systems? (EARTH)

4.3 - Water has a major role in shaping the Earth’s surface.

¨     Water circulates through the Earth’s crust, oceans and atmosphere.

B12 Describe how the sun’s energy impacts the water cycle.

B13 Describe the role of water in erosion and river formation.

STC KIT: LAND/WATER

Energy Transfer and Transformations – What is the role of energy in our world? (PHYS)

4.4 - Electrical and magnetic energy can be transferred and transformed.

¨     Electricity in circuits can be transformed into light, heat, sound and magnetic effects.

¨     Magnets can make objects move without direct contact between the object and the magnet.

 

B14 Describe how batteries and wires can transfer energy to light a light bulb.

B15 Explain how simple electrical circuits can be used to determine which materials conduct electricity.

B16 Describe the properties of magnets, and how they can be used to identify and separate mixtures of solid materials.

STC KIT: CIRCUITS

REQUIRED CMT EMBEDDED TASK: GO WITH THE FLOW (Light Bulb)


 

Grade 5

Core Themes, Content Standards and Expected Performances

Content Standards

Expected Performances

Energy Transfer and Transformations – What is the role of energy in our world?(PHYS)

5.1 - Sound and light are forms of energy.

¨     Sound is a form of energy that is produced by the vibration of objects and is transmitted by the vibration of air and objects.

¨     Light is a form of energy that travels in a straight line and can be reflected by a mirror, refracted by a lens, or absorbed by objects.

 

B17 Describe the factors that affect the pitch and loudness of sound produced by vibrating objects.

B18 Describe how sound is transmitted, reflected and/or absorbed by different materials.

 SOUND

------------------------------------------------------

B19 Describe how light is absorbed and/or reflected by different surfaces.

B20 Describe how light absorption and reflection allow one to see the shapes and colors of objects.

Science and Technology in Society – How do science and technology affect the quality of our lives? (PHY)

5.4 - Humans have the capacity to build and use tools to advance the quality of their lives.

¨     Advances in technology allow individuals to acquire new information about the world.

 

B24 Compare and contrast the structures of the human eye with those of the camera.

B25 Describe the uses of different instruments, such as eye glasses, magnifiers, periscopes and telescopes, to enhance our vision.

LIGHT AND USES

Structure and Function – How are organisms structured to ensure efficiency and survival? (BIO)

5.2 - Perceiving and responding to information about the environment is critical to the survival of organisms.

¨     The sense organs perceive stimuli from the environment and send signals to the brain through the nervous system.

 

B21 Describe the structure and function of the human senses and the signals they perceive.

SENSES

REQUIRED CMT EMBEDDED TASK: CATCH IT

Earth in the Solar System – How does the position of Earth in the solar system affect conditions on our planet? (EARTH)

5.3 - Most objects in the solar system are in a regular and predictable motion.

¨     The positions of the Earth and moon relative to the sun explain the cycles of day and night, and the monthly moon phases.

B22 Explain the cause of day and night based on the rotation of Earth on its axis. 

B23 Describe the monthly changes in the appearance of the moon, based on the moon’s orbit around the Earth.

DSM: SUN, EARTH, MOON

CMT TEST IN MARCH

HEALTH TOPICS

HEALTH TOPICS

(CT STATE HEALTH)


THE STANDARDS FOR SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY, LITERACY AND NUMERACY ARE INTEGRAL PARTS OF THE CONTENT STANDARDS FOR EACH GRADE LEVEL IN THIS CLUSTER.

Grades 6-8 Core Scientific Inquiry, Literacy and Numeracy

                                          How is scientific knowledge created and communicated?           

Content Standards

Expected Performances

SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY

¨     Scientific inquiry is a thoughtful and coordinated attempt to search out, describe, explain and predict natural phenomena.

¨     Scientific inquiry progresses through a continuous process of questioning, data collection, analysis and interpretation.

¨     Scientific inquiry requires the sharing of findings and ideas for critical review by colleagues and other scientists.

 

SCIENTIFIC LITERACY

¨     Scientific literacy includes speaking, listening, presenting, interpreting, reading and writing about science.

¨     Scientific literacy also includes the ability to search for and assess the relevance and credibility of scientific information found in various print and electronic media.

 

SCIENTIFIC NUMERACY

¨     Scientific numeracy includes the ability to use mathematical operations and procedures to calculate, analyze and present scientific data and ideas.

 

C INQ.1       Identify questions that can be answered through scientific investigation.

C INQ.2       Read, interpret and examine the credibility of scientific claims in different sources of information.

C INQ.3       Design and conduct appropriate types of scientific investigations to answer different questions.

C INQ.4       Identify independent and dependent variables, and those variables that are kept constant, when designing an experiment.

C INQ.5       Use appropriate tools and techniques to make observations and gather data.

C INQ.6       Use mathematical operations to analyze and interpret data.

C INQ.7       Identify and present relationships between variables in appropriate graphs.

C INQ.8       Draw conclusions and identify sources of error.

C INQ.9       Provide explanations to investigated problems or questions.

C INQ.10    Communicate about science in different formats, using relevant science vocabulary, supporting evidence and clear logic.

 


 

Grade 6

                                    Core Themes, Content Standards and Expected Performances                                   

Content Standards

Expected Performances

Matter and Energy in Ecosystems – How do matter and energy flow through ecosystems? (BIO)

6.2 - An ecosystem is composed of all the populations that are living in a certain space and the physical factors with which they interact.

Populations in ecosystems are affected by biotic factors, such as other populations, and abiotic factors, such as soil and water supply.

Populations in ecosystems can be categorized as producers, consumers and decomposers of organic matter.

C 4.   Describe how abiotic factors, such as temperature, water and sunlight, affect the ability of plants to create their own food through photosynthesis.

C 5.   Explain how populations are affected by predator-prey relationships.

C 6.   Describe common food webs in different Connecticut ecosystems.

 

 

Energy in the Earth’s Systems – How do external and internal sources of energy affect the Earth’s systems? (EARTH)

6.3 - Variations in the amount of the sun’s energy hitting the Earth’s surface affect daily and seasonal weather patterns. 

Local and regional weather are affected by the amount of solar energy these areas receive and by their proximity to a large body of water.

C 7.   Describe the effect of heating on the movement of  molecules in solids, liquids and gases.

 C 8.   Explain how local weather conditions are related to the temperature, pressure and water content of the atmosphere and the proximity to a large body of water.

 C 9.   Explain how the uneven heating of the Earth’s surface causes winds.

 

Science and Technology in Society – How do science and technology affect the quality of our lives? (EARTH)

6.4 - Water moving across and through earth materials carries with it the products of human activities.

Most precipitation that falls on Connecticut eventually reaches Long Island Sound.

 C 10.   Explain the role of septic and sewage systems on the quality of surface and ground water.

 C 11.   Explain how human activity may impact water resources in Connecticut, such as ponds, rivers and the Long Island Sound ecosystem. 

 REQUIRED CMT EMBEDDED TASK: DIG IN

Energy Transfer and Transformations – What is the role of energy in our world? (PHYS)

7.1 - Energy provides the ability to do work and can exist in many forms.

Work is the process of making objects move through the application of force.

Energy can be stored in many forms and can be transformed into the energy of motion.

 

C 12.   Explain the relationship among force, distance and work, and use the relationship (W=F x D) to calculate work done in lifting heavy objects.

 

C 13.   Explain how simple machines, such as inclined planes, pulleys and levers, are used to create mechanical advantage.

 

 C 14.   Describe how different types of stored (potential) energy can be used to make objects move.

 


 

Grade 7  Core Themes, Content Standards and Expected Performances

Content Standards

Expected Performances

Properties of Matter – How does the structure of matter affect the properties and uses of materials?(PHYS)

6.1 - Materials can be classified as pure substances or mixtures, depending on their chemical and physical properties.

Mixtures are made of combinations of elements and/or compounds, and they can be separated by using a variety of physical means.

Pure substances can be either elements or compounds, and they cannot be broken down by physical means.

C0.  Describe matter and its properties.

C 1.  Describe the properties of common elements, such as oxygen, hydrogen, carbon, iron and aluminum.

C 2.  Describe how the properties of simple compounds, such as water and table salt, are different from the properties of the elements of which they are made.

C 3.  Explain how mixtures can be separated by using the properties of the substances from which they are made, such as particle size, density, solubility and boiling point.

Structure and Function – How are organisms structured to ensure efficiency and survival? (BIO)

7.2 - Many organisms, including humans, have specialized organ systems that interact with each other to maintain dynamic internal balance.

All organisms are composed of one or more cells; each cell carries on life-sustaining functions.

C 15. Describe the basic structures of an animal cell, including nucleus, cytoplasm, mitochondria and cell membrane, and how they function to support life.

C 25. Explain the similarities and differences in cell division in somatic and germ cells.

 

Heredity and Evolution – What processes are responsible for life’s unity and diversity? (BIO)

8.2 - Reproduction is a characteristic of living systems and it is essential for the continuation of every species.

Heredity is the passage of genetic information from one generation to another.

Some of the characteristics of an organism are inherited and some result from interactions with the environment.

C 26. Describe the structure and function of the male and female human reproductive systems, including the process of egg and sperm production.

 C 27.  Describe how genetic information is organized in genes on chromosomes, and explain sex determination in humans.

 

Structure and Function – How are organisms structured to ensure efficiency and survival?(BIO)

7.2 - Many organisms, including humans, have specialized organ systems that interact with each other to maintain dynamic internal balance.

 

 

Multicellular organisms need specialized structures and systems to perform basic life functions.

C 17. Explain how the human musculo-skeletal system supports the body and allows movement.

C 16. Describe the structures of the human digestive, respiratory and circulatory systems, and explain how they function to bring oxygen and nutrients to the cells and expel waste materials.

REQUIRED CMT EMBEDDED TASK: FEEL THE BEAT

Science and Technology in Society – How do science and technology affect the quality of our lives?

7.4 - Technology allows us to improve food production and preservation, thus improving our ability to meet the nutritional needs of growing populations.

Various microbes compete with humans for the same sources of food.

  C 21. Describe how freezing, dehydration, pickling and irradiation prevent food spoilage caused by microbes.

DISTRICT EMBEDDED TASK: FOOD

 

Grade 8  Core Themes, Content Standards and Expected Performances

Content Standards

Expected Performances

Science and Technology in Society – How do science and technology affect the quality of our lives? (PHYS)

8.4 - In the design of structures there is a need to consider factors such as function, materials, safety, cost and appearance.

Bridges can be designed in different ways to withstand certain loads and potentially destructive forces.

C. 30  Explain how beam, truss and suspension bridges are designed to withstand the forces that act on them.

 

DISTRICT EMBEDDED TASK: STRONG BRIDGES

 

 

Forces and Motion – What makes objects move the way they do? (PHYS)

8.1 - An object’s inertia causes it to continue moving the way it is moving unless it is acted upon by a force to change its motion.

The motion of an object can be described by its position, direction of motion and speed.

An unbalanced force acting on an object changes its speed and/or direction of motion.

Objects moving in circles must experience force acting toward the center.

 

C 22. Calculate the average speed of a moving object and illustrate the motion of objects in graphs of distance over time.

C 23. Describe the qualitative relationships among force, mass and changes in motion.

C 24. Describe the forces acting on an object moving in a circular path.

 

REQUIRED EMBEDDED CMT TASK: SHIPPING/SLIDING

Earth in the Solar System – How does the position of Earth in the solar system affect conditions on our planet? (PHYS)

8.3 - The solar system is composed of planets and other objects that orbit the sun.

Gravity is the force that governs the motions of objects in the solar system.

The motion of the Earth and moon relative to the sun causes daily, monthly and yearly cycles on Earth.

C 28. Explain the effect of gravity on the orbital movement of planets in the solar system.

 

C 29. Explain how the regular motion and relative position of the sun, Earth and moon affect the seasons, phases of the moon and eclipses.

 

 

 

Energy in the Earth’s Systems – How do external and internal sources of energy affect the Earth’s systems? (EARTH)

7.3 - Landforms are the result of the interaction of constructive and destructive forces over time.

Volcanic activity and the folding and faulting of rock layers during the shifting of the Earth’s crust affect the formation of mountains, ridges and valleys.

Glaciation, weathering and erosion change the Earth’s surface by moving earth materials from place to place.

C 18. Describe how folded and faulted rock layers provide evidence of the gradual up and down motion of the Earth’s crust. 

C 19. Explain how glaciation, weathering and erosion create and shape valleys and floodplains.

C 20. Explain how the boundaries of tectonic plates can be inferred from the location of earthquakes and volcanoes.

DISTRICT EMBEDDED TASK: EROSION

(MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE CMT IN MARCH)

The Changing Earth – How do materials cycle through the Earth’s systems? (STRAND III)

9.7 - Elements on Earth move among reservoirs in the solid earth, oceans, atmosphere, organisms as part of biogeochemical cycles.

Elements on Earth exist in essentially fixed amounts and are located in various chemical reservoirs.

The cyclical movement of matter between reservoirs is driven by the Earth’s internal and external sources of energy.

D 21. Explain how internal energy of the Earth causes matter to cycle through the magma and the solid earth.

(POSSIBLE 4th Quarter TOPIC)

DISTRICT EMBEDDED TASK: CYCLES

 

 

NATURAL DISASTERS

NATURAL DISASTERS (NAEP standard)


PROJECTED New Haven Science Fair TIME LINE

OCT-NOV:     Science Fair Committee obtains mentors.  Teachers/Students submit mentor request forms.

 

OCT-DEC:      Students, Mentors, Teachers and Parents together, brainstorm ideas for a science fair project.

 

OCT-DEC:      Last Date to request help from the SRC Committee: November 20, 2008.

 

OCT-JAN:      Student should get a composition book in which to keep all lab and library notes.  This will be the students’ LAB NOTEBOOK.  It will be part of the science fair display.

 

OCT-JAN:      Student should start to do library/internet research to learn more about possible topic(s).

 

OCT-FEB:      Student decides on topic to research and investigate and writes down the STATEMENT OF THE QUESTION, HYPOTHESIS, and independent and dependent variables.

 

NOV- FEB:     Student decides on experiment, makes list of the MATERIALS needed and writes down the PROCEDURE step by step.

 

NOV-FEB:      Student must submit SRC Pre-approval form if research is on a non-exempt topic, before research is started Deadline is January 14, 2008.  SRC resubmission deadline is February 4, 2008.

 

NOV-FEB:      Student starts lab research.  Submits project display request form.

 

DEC-MAR:     Student finishes lab research.  Makes DATA TABLE and GRAPH.  Writes the RESULTS, CONCLUSIONS , ANALYSIS and APPLICATIONS in LAB NOTEBOOK.

 

DEC-APR:      Student continues library research and finishes it by the end of March.  Research paper is to be typed on a computer.  Research paper must have a complete bibliography.

 

JAN-APR:      Student is to start making PROJECT DISPLAY BOARD.  Photos and pictures are a great idea, as long as students are not identified by name in them.

 

FEB:                Schools Submit School Participation Forms.  Final Request for Project Display Boards

 

MAR-APR:     Everything should be finished.  The LAB NOTEBOOK, the RESEARCH PAPER, the DISPLAY BOARD, THE 1-PAGE ABSTRACT, THE SELF EVALUATION.

 

MAR 11-15th:  CT State Science Fair for grades 7-12 only, Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT

 

APR:   School Science Fairs take place by Apr. 4, 2008.

Student registration deadline: Apr. 11, 2008 for New Haven Science Fair., Media Release Forms

 

Apr 11-May 10th Final School Project Allocations, Bus Schedule

 

New Haven Science Fair: Commons Hall, Yale University

Tuesday, May 13:       Set up and preliminary judging, project displays labeled

 

Wednesday, May 14:  Students present for judging 9am-12pm, projects on display in afternoon

Thursday, May 15:     Projects picked up      Awards ceremony       Woolsey Hall, Yale University,


NEW HAVEN SCIENCE FAIR EVALUATION SHEET GRADES K-4

                                                                                                                        ___Self   ____ Judge

1          Scientific Thought (30 Points)

                        Is it a good experiment?

1          Uses observation skills -seeing, hearing touching

 

2.         Comparisons made.  (sensory, linear, weight, capacity, quantity)  (qualitative and quantitative measurement)

 

3.         Hypothesis shows cause and effect

 

4.         Experiment well designed?  (changes one thing at a time, controlled)

 

5.         Data gathered and organized into a table or graph

 

6.         Conclusions supported by data. 

 

SECTION ONE TOTAL

 

                                                                                                                                   

2          Creativity (15 Points)

                        Is it a creative experiment?

1          Originality, uniqueness, use of materials

 

2.         Poses an interesting question

 

3.         Creative applications to everyday life

 

SECTION TWO TOTAL

 

 

 

3          Display and Components (25 Points)

                        Is it presented well?

1          Parts are complete (abstract, display, lab notebook)

 

2.         Shows good workmanship, orderliness, neatness

 

3.         Has good visuals: drawings and photos.

 

4.         Shows evidence of outside research

 

5.         Experiment procedure clear and understandable

 

SECTION THREE TOTAL

 

 

 

            4          Student Oral Presentation (30 Points)

                        Is it explained well?

1          Project within student’s level of understanding

 

2.         Student understands science of project

 

3.         Student can explain why it is a good experiment

 

4.         Oral presentation is in a logical order

 

5.         Student can explain research behind project

 

6.         Student can explain importance, connections to real life

 

SECTION FOUR TOTAL

 

 

* Please assign a value from 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest) for each item     GRAND TOTAL          (           )

 

Name of Project: _________________________________________________________________________

Name of Student(s): _____________________________________________________________________

School_____________________Name of Teacher: _________________________

Display #:_________________  Judge Name:__________________________Mentor Name:__________________

 

 

NEW HAVEN SCIENCE FAIR EVALUATION SHEET GRADES 5-12                                                                                                                       ___Self   ____ Judge

1          Scientific Thought (30 Points)

                        Is it a good experiment?

1          Purpose of project and hypothesis clearly stated, identifies independent/dependent variables (cause and effect)

 

2.         Experiment well designed (changes one variable at a time, constant variables, control group)

 

3.         Procedure, including materials,  explained and repeatable

 

4.         Data gathered and organized into a table or graph

 

5.         Conclusions supported by data, directly related to hypothesis and discuss validity

 

6.         Discussion shows implications for future study

 

SECTION ONE TOTAL

 

                                                                                                                                   

2          Creativity/Skill (15 Points)

                        Is it a creative/skillful experiment?

1          Originality, uniqueness, use of materials

 

2.         Measurements and data in data table and graph format, with appropriate mathematical analysis

 

3.         Real world implications showing creative applications to everyday life.

 

SECTION TWO TOTAL

 

 

3          Display and Components (25 Points)

                        Is it presented well?

1          Parts are complete (abstract, display, lab notebook, research paper, self evaluation)

 

2.         Lab notebook clearly lists dates and discusses pre experiment work and shows all experimental data

 

3.         Display is well organized, neat, legible, and understandable

 

4.         Discusses outside research, with appropriate bibliography

 

5.         Experiment procedure clear and understandable, has good visuals: drawings and photos

 

SECTION THREE TOTAL

 

 

4          Student Oral Presentation (30 Points)

                        Is it explained well?

1          Project within student’s level of understanding, appropriate level of difficulty

 

2.         Student understands science of project, can provide logical solutions to “what if” questions related to project

 

3.         Student can explain why it is a valid experiment, explain conclusions in relationship to independent and dependent variables

 

4.         Student has logical order and structure to oral presentation

 

5.         Student can explain research behind project, originality of idea and experiment

 

6.         Student can explain importance, connections to real life, and implications for society

 

SECTION FOUR TOTAL

 

 

* Please assign a value from 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest) for each item     GRAND TOTAL          (           )


SCIENCE FAIR

 

Science Fair is not a separate curriculum unit. Science Fair supports the inquiry and experimentation goals of all the science curriculum.

Students doing science fair projects should be encouraged to do projects based on the concepts and ideas covered in the New Haven science curriculum for their class, so that the knowledge and skills can be integrated with school classroom learning.

 

Mentors are available to: help teach students about the scientific process, help students select science fair topics, help support the concepts taught in class and in the science fair project.

 

Each school makes their own decision about the level of participation in Science Fair.

 

This year, the New Haven Science Fair will be held on May 13-15th. It is an ideal time in the year to have culminating projects.

 

There are new judging/evaluation guidelines, and a new Science Fair Program Booklet, which all schools will be receiving soon.

Further information at newhavenscience.org or nhsciencefair.org

 

OUTSIDE GROUPS

 

Many outside groups and programs are available to work with students and teachers.

 

Common Ground High, Southern CT, eeSmarts, Urban Resources, are just some of the programs

 

Each school can identify programs that support the science curriculum for their needs.

 

Yale University, especially, has strong support for New Haven Science. It is extremely important that administrators and teachers make sure all programs, whether field trips, guest speakers, or curriculum and professional development, exactly aligns with NHPS Science Standards and pacing for that particular gra


                                                New Haven Public Schools

 

TO:            Elementary/Middle School Principals, Assistants

FROM:      Richard Therrien

DATE:       May 23 , 2007

RE:   Science Supply Recommendations

 

SCIENCE MATERIALS RECOMMENDATION LIST K-8 May 24, 2007

 

Many schools have asked for some guidelines in planning for materials purchases for the upcoming school year. Much depends on the timing and implementation of science at each school.

 

Grades K-3 are being rewritten to align with state standards this year. Grades 4, 5 & 6 science do NOT have a separate set curriculum at this time, since there are not separate science teachers for these grades, and curriculum will be rewritten next year. Grades 7 & 8 are being written this year as well.

 

It is NOT recommended to buy science textbooks at this time for grades K-5. Kit based programs provide students with the experiences needed to develop conceptual understanding. The STC and FOSS kits have writing, reading, and assessment components that integrate well with our literacy standards. The teacher guides and training videos and websites that are included are a rich resource. There are non fiction readers and magazines included in the newest versions.

 

The literacy department has been working as well, and can make recommendation for further nonfiction reading, from a variety of sources, including Newbridge Discovery readers, to align with the units.

 

We are still currently using STC Science Kits, 2 per year, provided by the district, not quite aligned with the state frameworks yet. The newest version kits include writing, math, literacy as well, and have conceptual storylines as well as research proven lessons for improved student achievement.

 

A good resource for the upper elementary grades to supplement district provided kits are the Science Daybooks, that contain basic concepts, vocabulary and hands on activities, as well as the ScienceSaurus student handbooks found from GreatSource.

 

However if you may choose to buy your own kits to keep, and wish to align closer with the state frameworks, I have included some detailed recommendations for supplies, kits, texts for K-8.

 

Here is a tentative list, with links to web ordering, based on our draft curriculum and pacing guide, as well as input from the CT SDE.

Thank you.

 

Richard Therrien




 

Grade K

STC Kit GH-97-1201 Weather $514.95 (most provided by district)

FOSS Kit Wood $763 (most provided by district)

FOSS Kit Trees $529 (most provided by district)

 

Grade One

 

Math connection: GH-97-1301 Comparing and Measuring  $499.95 (most provided by district)

Delta Kit DSMIII Sunshine and Shadows $388

FOSS Balance and Motion (Motion part only ) Kit $519

STC Kit GH-97-1101 Organisms $554.95

 

Grade Two

 Math connection: STC Kit GH-97-1701 Balancing and Weighing $749.95 (most provided by district)

STC Kit GH-97-1401 Solids and Liquids $644.95 or STC Kit GH-97-1801 Changes $429.95

STC Kit GH-97-1601 Soils $479.95

Nutrition (no kit yet), supplemental/free materials Food Chemistry STC Kit (Grade level 4/5) can be used, most provided by district

STC Kit GH-97-1501 Butterflies $234.95 (most provided by district)

 

Grade Three

STC Kit GH-97-2001 Rocks and Minerals $1059.95

STC Kit GH-97-2101 Chemical Tests $689.95 (most provided by district)

Recycling (no kit yet) supplemental/free materials could use STC Kit Technology of Paper

STC Kit GH-97-1901 Plants $539.95 (most provided by district)

 

Grade Four

STC Kit GH-97-2601 Electric Circuits (most provided by district)$764.95

(Magnets and Motors Kit can also be used)

STC Kit GH-97-3001 Motion and Design (most provided by district) $949.95

STC Kit GH-97-2801 Ecosystems $749.95 Class Set

STC Kit GH-97-2301 Land and Water $919.95 Class Set

 

Science Resource Daybook For Grade 4 with Science Saurus W4-051556 $24.75

 

Grade Five

STC Kit GH-97-2701 Microworlds $899.95 (most provided by district)

STC Kit GH-97-2201 Sound $574.95 for Class Set

 

STC Kit GH-97-5206 Light $3795 for Class Set

OR Two GEMS Kits  GEMS 11-4301 Color Analyzers $105    AND

                            GEMS   11-4801 More Than Magnifiers  $159

 

GEMS 11-4001 Earth/Moon Kit $275

 

Science Resource Daybook For Grade 5 with Science Saurus W4-051559 $24.75

 

Grade Six (if self contained, see book recommendations as well)

FOSS Levers and Pulleys Kit Class Set $688

STC Kit GH-97-2801 Ecosystems $749.95 Class Set

ScienceSaurus Grade 6-8 Student Handbook W4-052916 $17.25

 


Tentative recommendation for 6/7/8 science , New Haven Pubic Schools as of 5/2007

Note that buying the three modules per grade should work out to $45 per student.



Here is the list.


Each teacher should have set for students, 1 teacher edition, 1 teaching resources per module.

Classroom set of materials/supplies if possible. The kits are designed to accompany the text.

Each teacher should also have: a set of the program wide resources (pg 11 of newest Prentice Hall catalog)... , which should include Adapted Reading Study Workbooks, Adapted Tests as well as technology resources…Spanish editions and workbooks are also available. These can probably be assumed to be comped with a large purchase. Use science supervisor’s name when ordering and local sales rep to receive complimentary materials.

 

Local Sales Rep

E-Mail Address:      John.Landers@pearsoned.com

Voice Mail:   (800) 435-3499       Ext.1469

Phone:         (860) 349-0383       FAX:  860) 349-9566

 

ALL 6-8 Students should have access to

The Nature of Science and Technology

0132011603 The Nature of Science and Technology Student Edition $15.97

0132011778 Teacher’s Edition $32.47

0132035618 Teacher Resource Pack $99.97

 

0131901451 Consumable Material Kit $49.97

0131901621 non Consumable Material Kit $134.97

 

-----------------------------------------------------

Some Schools are choosing to also adopt a departmentalized approach for sixth grade, which aligns with the following Prentice Hall Modules:

 

For Specialized Grade Six Programs:

 

6th grade Environmental Science

0-13-2011484Student Edition 14.97

0132011662 Teacher Edition 32.47

013203549-9 Teaching Resources 99.97

 

013190132x Consumable Materials        219.97

0131901508 Non Consumable Materials 404.97

----------------------------------------------

6th grade Weather and Climate

0-13-2011522 Student Edition 14.97

0132011700 Teacher Edition 32.47

01312035537  Teaching Resources 99.97

 

0131901370 Consumable Materials        89.97

0131901540 Non Consumable Materials 203.47

-----------------------------------------------------

6th Grade Earth’s Waters

0-13-2011514 Student Edition 14.97

0132011697Teacher Edition 32.47

01312035529 Teaching Resources 99.97

 

0131901362  Consumable Materials       251.97

0131901532 Non Consumable Materials 615.97

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



DEPARTMENTALIZED SEVENTH/EIGHTH GRADE

7th grade Chemical Building Blocks

0-13-2011557 Student Edition 14.97

0132011727 Teacher Edition 32.47

0131902849 Teaching Resources 75.97

0131901397 Consumable Materials        169.97

0131901567 Non Consumable Materials 261.97

**  OR Carolina STC Kit   GH-97-4406 Properties of Matter $2895 Class Set

----------------------------------------------

7th grade Cells and Heredity

0-13-201145X Student Edition 14.97

0132011646 Teacher Edition 32.47

013190275X Teaching Resources 75.97

0131901393 Consumable Materials        148.47

0131901486 Non Consumable Materials 327.47

** OR Carolina STC Kit GH 97-4806 Organisms from Macro to Micro $3195 Class Set

-----------------------------------------------------

7th grade Human Biology

0-13-2011476 Student Edition 14.97

0132011654 Teacher Edition 32.47

0131902768 Teaching Resources 75.97

0131901311 Consumable Materials        202.47

0131901486 Non Consumable Materials 395.47

*** OR Carolina STC Kit  GH-97-4006 Human Body Systems  $2495 for class set

----------------------------------------------------

(Optional) 7th Grade From Bacteria to Plants

0132035170 Student Edition 15.97

013201162X Teacher Edition 32.47

0132035448 Teacher Resources 99.97

0131901281 Consumable Materials 224.97

013190146X Non Consumable Materials 198.97

---------------------------------------------------

8th grade Motion, Forces, and Energy

0-13-2011573 Student Edition 14.97

0132011743 Teacher Edition 32.47

0131902865 Teaching Resources 75.97

0131901427 Consumable Materials        61.47

0131901591 Non Consumable Materials 422.97

OR STC Kit 97-4601 Energy, Motion, Machines Class Set $270

----------------------------------------------------

8th Grade Astronomy (solar system only)

0-13-201145X Student Edition 14.97

0132011646 Teacher Edition 32.47

013190275X Teaching Resources 75.97

0131901389 Consumable Materials        94.97

0131901559 Non Consumable Materials 205.97

** Or Carolina STC Kit  GH-97-5006 Earth In Space $3895 Class Set

---------------------------------------------------

8th Grade Inside Earth

0-13-2011492 Student Edition 14.97

0132011670 Teacher Edition 32.47

0131902784 Teaching Resources 75.97

0131901346 Consumable Materials        143.97

0131901524 Non Consumable Materials 353.47

** OR Carolina STC GH-97-4206 Catastrophic Events $3895

------------------------------------------------------------------

(Optional) 8th Grade Earth’s Changing Surface

0-13-2011560 Student Edition 15.97

0-13-201168-9 Teacher’s Edition 32.47

0-13-203551-0 Teaching Resources

0-13-190135-4 Consumable Materials 143.97

0-13-190153-2 Non-Consumable Materials 248.47

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Materials Also Recommended for Grades Six Through Eight are smaller unit material kits  per class.

 (Title I Schools will already have these, 1 per class as of June 2007).

Non Title I Schools will receive these Jan 2008.

Frey Scientific

                        c/o School Specialty Science

                        PO Box 3000

                        80 Northwest Blvd

                        Nashua, NH 03061-3000

                        1-800-225-3739

and also through our online ordering with School Specialty at the 26% state discount:

 

1      Grade         6               15529717        UrbanWaterTestKit                                          38.95                                     38.95

1      Grade         6               15530411        NeoSciHowScientistsDoScienceKit                    119                                        119.00

1      Grade         6               15531488        NeoSciFoodWebKit                                         49.95                                     49.95

1      Grade         6               15567542        NeoSciExploringGroundwarer                            79                                         79.00

1      Grade         6               15570787        NeoSciExploringWeatherKit                              89                                         89.00

1      Grade         6               15572227        NeoSciInvestigatingWaterPollutionKit                69                                         69.00

1      Grade         6               15573625        NeoSciPulleysMachinesKit                               119

 

1      Grade         7               15530411        NeoSciHowScientistsDoScienceKit                    119                                        119.00

1      Grade         7               15567479        NeoSciExploringCellProcesses Kit                     56                                         56.00

1      Grade         7               15567518        NeoSciMicrobe Hunt Kit                                  59                                         59.00

1      Grade         7               15567521        NeoSciMicrobe Refill                                      39.45                                     39.45

1      Grade         7               15577099        NeoSciElement Kit                                          54                                         54.00

1      Grade         7               15583815        GeneralChemModelKit                                     104

      

1      Grade         8               15529112        SimulatingRockCycleKit                                  72                                         72.00

1      Grade         8               15530411        NeoSciHowScientistsDoScienceKit                    119                                        119.00

1      Grade         8               15530479        NeoSciEarthShakesLabKit                                69                                         69.00

1      Grade         8               15530568        EarthMoonKit                                                24.95                                     24.95

1      Grade         8               15571181        BalsaWoodBridgeBuildingKit                           109                                        109.00

1      Grade         8               15576036        PlateTectonicsKit                                            221                                        221.00

1      Grade         8               15576940        NeSciChemWeatheringRocksKit                        59                                         59.00

1      Grade         8               15577066        NeoSciInvestigatingForceMotionKit                   119                                        119.00

 

 

Other items that each student Grade 6-8 should have access to include:

(more details will be forthcoming when curriculum is finalized)

 

Class set stopwatches

Hand lenses

Graduated Cylinders (200 ml)

Beakers (250 ml)

Balances (Double Pan or electronic)

Simple microscopes, slide sets

Rulers

Meter Sticks

Measuring Tape

Duct Tape!

Wood

Weights

String

HotPlates

Gloves

Goggles