NUTRITION

 

SECOND GRADE

 

Unit 3

NUTRITION

GRADE LEVEL AND CONTENT AREA:

Second Grade/Science

 

OVERVIEW:

In this unit, “Nutrition”, students will learn that in order for people to survive nutritional needs must be met.  Students will also learn that these nutritional needs can come from plants or animals, and these nutritional needs come in the form of carbohydrates, proteins, and fat.


 

SCIENCE CONTENT STANDARD 2.4

CONCEPTUAL THEME:

Science and Technology in Society - How do science and technology affect the quality of our lives?

 

CONTENT STANDARD:

2.4 – Human beings, like all other living things, have special nutritional needs for survival.

 

GRADE-LEVEL CONCEPT 1: u The essential components of balanced nutrition can be obtained from plant and animal sources.

GRADE-LEVEL EXPECTATIONS:

  1. People need to eat a variety of foods to get the energy and nutrients they need to grow, move and stay healthy.  Foods are classified as grains, fruits, vegetables, dairy, meats and beans, and oils. 
  2. Some foods people eat come from plants that grow wild or are planted by farmers as crops. A fruit is the ripened ovary of a flower; vegetables are the roots, stems, leaves or flowers of plants.   
  3. Some foods people eat come from animals that are wild or are raised on ranches.  Meat, fish, dairy products and eggs all come from animals.  
  4. The types of crops that can grow in an area depend on the climate and soil.  Some foods are grown and sold by local farms, and some foods are grown far away and transported to local grocery stores.

GRADE-LEVEL CONCEPT 2: u People eat different foods in order to satisfy nutritional needs for carbohydrates, proteins and fats.

GRADE-LEVEL EXPECTATIONS:

1.     All people need the same basic nutrients to grow, move and stay healthy; different cultures satisfy these needs by consuming different foods.

2.     The level of energy and nutrients individuals need depends on their age, gender and how active they are. 

3.     Most foods contain a combination of nutrients. Labels on food packages describe the nutrients contained in the food and how much energy the food provides (calories).

4.     Breads, cereals, rice and pasta are sources of carbohydrates, which provide energy.

5.     Meat, poultry, fish, beans, eggs and nuts are sources of protein, which keeps the body working properly.

6.     Fruits and vegetables are sources of vitamins and minerals, which keep the body healthy.

7.     Nuts, meats and fish are sources of fats and oils, which provide energy.

 

KEY SCIENCE VOCABULARY:  nutrient, crop, grain, carbohydrate, protein, dairy,  fats, oils, energy

CMT EXPECTED PERFORMANCES

 

A23 Identify the sources of common foods and classify them by their basic food groups.

A24 Describe how people in different cultures use different food sources to meet their nutritional needs.

 

 


 

 

CONCEPTS:  Need to know about…

 

1.    The essential components of balanced nutrition can be obtained from plant and animal sources.

2.    People eat different foods in order to satisfy nutritional needs for carbohydrates, proteins and fats.

 

SKILLS:  Be able to do:

 

·      Identify the sources of common foods and classify them by their basic food groups

·      Describe how people in different cultures use different food sources to meet their nutritional needs.

 

 

 

MISCONCEPTIONS:

·      Fats are not healthy for your body.

Fats, in fact, are nutrients that help provide energy to the body as well as help the body to store vitamins.  It is important to not that unsaturated fats are healthier than saturated fats.

·      You need to take vitamins in order to get all the daily vitamins your body needs.

If you eat a healthy diet you should not need to take vitamins; all the vitamins should be in the foods you eat.

 

 

BIG IDEA:  People have special nutritional needs in order to survive.  They can meet these needs by following a healthy diet rich in protein, carbohydrates, dairy, grains, and fats.  By using the Food Pyramid as a guide we can be sure that we are getting the correct amount of nutrients to keep us healthy.

 

 

 

CUMULATIVE QUESTIONS:

What are the nutrients people need in order to survive and stay healthy?

 

 

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS TO GUIDE INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT:

·      Where does the food we eat come from?

·      Why are carbohydrates important for us and what kinds of food would we find them in?

·      Why are proteins important for our body and what kinds of food would we find them in?

·      Why are fats important for our body and where do we find them?

·      How does the Food Pyramid help us to maintain a healthy body and meet our nutritional needs?

 

 

 

 

 

TOPICS or CONTEXT:  (What you will use to teach concepts and skills – particular unit, lessons, activities)

 

Lesson 1:  Preassessment

·      Students complete “Food Pyramid” Questionnaire

·      Students share what they know about nutrition and what they want to know about nutrition

·      Students prepare KWL chart

 

 

Lesson 2:  Where does food come from?

·      Students discuss where food comes from

·      Students brainstorm how food gets to the grocery store

·      Students

 

 

Lesson 3:  Exploring the Food Pyramid

·      Students observe foods are divided into food groups

·      Students identify  the colors that represent the food groups

·      Students identify foods they know on food pyramid

 

 

Lesson 4:  Sorting foods

·      Students sort foods into appropriate food groups

·      Students play Pyramid Go Fish with food cards

 

 

Lesson 5:  Eat Your Fruit and Veggies!

·      Students identify fruits and vegetables in their diet

·      Students graph number of fruits and vegetables they eat

 

 

Lesson 6:  Controlling Your Portions

·      Students will identify serving size and servings per container on a nutritional label.

·      Students match serving sizes to a given item that corresponds with the measurement or weight.

 

 

Lesson 7:   Get the Facts on Protein, Carbohydrates & Fats

·      Students will recognize foods that contain major nutrients our bodies need

 

 

Lesson 8:  “Moving More” Game:  Incorporating physical activity

·      Students act out movements

·      Brainstorm what students can do to keep moving

 

 

Lesson 9:  Designing Food Pyramid

·      Students use knowledge of food groups to make food pyramid poster

 

Lesson 10:  Foods Around the World

·      Students research countries and the foods eaten in those countries

·      Students describe how people from different cultures use different foods to meet their nutritional needs

 

 

Lesson 11:  International Day

·      Students prepare food from various countries

·      Students sample food and record findings on a chart

 

Lesson 12:  Post-Assessment

·      Students complete Post-Assessment Questionnaire to demonstrate their knowledge of what they learned

·      Students complete “L” section of the K-W-L Chart and discuss what they have learned

 

Lesson 13:  Culminating Activity

·      Students prepare full day’s meal plan including recommended daily foods for their body

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

~Lesson 1

 

 

 

LESSON 1:  PreAssessment

 

Materials: 

 

 

Procedure:

 

  1. Pass out “Food Pyramid Questionnaire” for kids to complete.  When done, collect for future reference.
  2. Hand out K-W-L Chart to students.  Have students complete “K” (What I Know) and “W” (What I Want to Know) section. 
  3. Discuss with students what they know about nutrition, why it’s important, and what they would like to know. 
  4. Using chart paper, record students answers on a K-W-L Chart, filling in the “What We Know” column and “What We Want to Know” column.
  5. Hang up the K-W-L Chart in this classroom for reference.

Closure:  Read Gregory, the Terrible Eater to the class and have a discussion on junk food and nutritious food. 

 

 

 

 

~Lesson 1

Name____________________________  Date _______________

Pre-Assessment

Food Pyramid Questionnaire

 

1.  Draw a circle around the foods that are in the GRAIN GROUP.

 

2.  Draw a rectangle around the foods that are in the VEGETABLE GROUP.

 

3.  Draw a square around the foods that are in the FRUIT GROUP.

 

4.  Draw a triangle around the foods that are in the MILK GROUP.

 

5.  Draw an oval around the foods that are in the MEAT and BEANS GROUP.

 

                        

 

 

5.0.2                              5.0.2

 

 

              LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01                        

 

                                                 

 

Pre-Assessment

(continued)

 

 

 

  1. What is the Food Pyramid?

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

2.  List 2-3 foods that are made up of carbohydrates.

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

 

3.  List 2-3 foods that are made up of protein. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

4.  List 2-3 foods that are made up of fats.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

5.  Why is it important for your body to eat healthy foods?

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

~Lesson 1

 

“Nutrition”

 

K-W-L Chart

 

What I Know

What I Want to Know

What I Learned

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

~Lesson 2

 

 

LESSON 2:  Where does food come from?

 

Objective:  Students will understand that food comes from different sources, including plants and animals.

 

Materials:

                

Procedure:

1.     With students sitting in a circle, hold up various food items and have students identify them.

2.     Lead a discussion, asking students where food comes from?  How do we get it?  Where is it grown?  Where is it made?  Where does it come from before it gets to the supermarket?  Does it come from a plant? Animal?  How do you know?

3.     Record students responses on chart paper.

4.     Explain that foods can come from plants or animals or may be made.  Give examples.  Have students come up with foods that come from plants and foods that come from animals.

5.     Continue recording students’ responses.

 

Closure:  Discuss what you have learned.  Have students share something they learned about where food comes from?

 

~Lesson 3

 

LESSON 3:  Exploring the Food Pyramid

 

 

Materials: 

 

·      Food Pyramid Chart (wall poster)

·      Student copies of the Food Pyramid

·      Crayons/pencils

 

Procedure:

1.     Display the Food Pyramid Chart .

2.     Have students describe what they see (pictures, stripes of different colors, stairs, etc.).

3.     Point out to students that foods are arranged into groups by color.

4.     Explain how the larger stripes represents food you should eat more of.

5.     Ask students to identify foods they are familiar with that are displayed on the food pyramid.  Have students name foods from the food groups that are not on the food pyramid.

6.     Discuss what the stairs on the food pyramid chart represent and have students describe ways they stay active.

7.     Have students color their own food pyramid using the wall poster as a guide and have them label the food groups.

Closure:  Discuss with the class what they learned about the Food Pyramid.  Have 2-3 students name a food and the food group where it would be found.

 

~Lesson 3

 

 

FOOD PYRAMID

Directions:  Think about what you learned about the Food Pyramid.  Color the Food Pyramid and label the food groups.  You may use the Food Pyramid Poster as a reference.

                                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

~Lesson 4

 

LESSON 4:  Sorting Foods

 

Objective:  Using their knowledge of the food pyramid, students will sort foods into appropriate food groups.

 

Materials:

 

 

Procedure:

 

  1. Review the food pyramid with your students.  Have students give examples of foods from the food groups.
  2. Tell students they will be reinforcing their knowledge of foods in the various food groups by playing “Go Fish”.
  3. Demonstrate how to play “Go Fish” with 2 students. 
  4. Put students in groups of 4 and distribute “Go Fish” cards.  Students play until there is a winner.
  5. Bring the class together and have students tell something they learned, i.e., a food that they might not have known went into a certain food group or maybe could have gone into more than one food group.

 

 

 

 

 

~Lesson 4

 

 

“Go Fish” Rules:

1.    Put students in groups of 4.

2.    The dealer deals out 4 cards to each student.  Put the rest in the middle.

3.    The first player (to the left of the dealer) asks the player to his left “Do you have a grain?”  If that player has a “grain” in his hand, he gives it to the player.  Otherwise, he says “Go Fish” and the player whose turn it is picks the top card from the deck in the middle.  Then, the next player to the left repeats step 3.  This continues until all the pairs have been found.

4.    The player with the most pairs wins the game!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

~Lesson 5

 

 

LESSON 5:   Eat Your Fruit & Veggies!

 

Objective:        Students identify fruits and vegetables in their diet.

Students graph number of fruits and vegetables they eat for 1 week.

 

Materials:

 

 

Procedure:

  1. On chart paper make 2 columns and label them “Fruits” and “Vegetables”.
  2. Have students name all the fruits and vegetables they can think of and write them in the appropriate column.
  3. Discuss the importance of eating fruits and vegetables for growing healthy.  Talk about the number of fruits and vegetables they should be eating each day.
  4. Tell students they will be keeping tracking of fruits and vegetables they eat over a one week period and at the end of the week they will graph their results.
  5. Give students daily food diary and explain how to complete it.  (Collect these each day)
  6. Have students tally the number of fruits and vegetables eaten for the week.
  7. Hand out graph paper.  Have students graph their results by making a bar graph.

Closure:  Discuss students’ results.  Ask students why someone has more fruits or vegetables than someone else.  What can you do to include more of these in your diet?  Is there some fruits and vegetables you never heard of that you might want to try now?

 

 FRUIT AND VEGETABLE GRAPH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                      FRUITS                   VEGETABLES

~Lesson 5

My Fruit and Vegetable Diary

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

Fruits:

 

Fruits:

Fruits:

Fruits:

Fruits:

 

 

 

 

 

Vegetables:

Vegetables:

Vegetables:

Vegetables:

Vegetables:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

~Lesson 6

LESSON 6:  Controlling Your Portions

Objectives: 

Students will identify serving size and servings per container on a nutritional label.

Students match serving sizes to a given item that corresponds with the measurement or weight.

 

Materials:

 

Procedure:

 

  1. Begin lesson by asking students what they eat for breakfast.  Ask if anyone eats cereal.  If so, how much?  Have 2 students show class how much cereal they eat by pouring cereal into bowl.  Show to class.
  2. Explain to students that they will be learning how to know “how much” cereal (or other food) you should eat.
  3. Tell the students you can find the answer by looking at nutrition labels on food packages. 
  4. Refer back to cereal box and point to the nutrition label on the side of the box.  Hand out a copy of the nutrition label to each student.
  5. Show students where portion size is listed.
  6. Now measure the amount listed on the box using a measuring cup.
  7. Pour this cereal into the bowl and show to all students.  Were the students who demonstrated their portions correct?  Too much?  Too little?
  8. Explain they can figure out how much is in a cup, ½ cup, etc. without using measuring utensils; they can use other items they are familiar with to help them “eyeball” correction portions.

 

Show students  what a serving size looks like:  For example, 3 oz of meat can be equal to approximately the palm of your hand or a deck of cards; 1 oz of cheese is equal to 2 dice, and so on.

 

 

 

 

~Lesson 7

 

LESSON 7:  Protein, Carbohydrates, Fat? 

Objective:  Students will recognize foods that contain major nutrients our bodies need.

 

Materials:

 

Procedure:

  1. Start the lesson by asking students how a car would go if it didn’t have gas in its tank.  Students should respond by saying that it can’t go anywhere because there is no gas and no power for the engine.  Explain that just like a car, people need power their bodies, however, we use food—not gas.  If we didn’t have food we would not be able to live.
  2. Explain further that people can’t have any kind of food; there are certain foods their body needs to give them nutrients (a source of energy).
  3. Read The Monster Health Book  (you may choose which parts to read).
  4. Explain and/or review with  your students that there are major nutrients—proteins, carbohydrates, fats, minerals, vitamins, and water that we all need. 
  5. Review the major points about proteins, carbohydrates, and fats.

Closure:           Review with students the major nutrients our bodies needs.  Have students give examples of a healthy carbohydrate, protein and/or fat that they can include in their diet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

~Lesson 8

LESSON 8:  Get Moving!  Incorporating Physical Activity

Objective:    Students brainstorm movements they do to keep them active.

Students get active by acting out movements in short segments.

 

Materials:

 

Procedure:

  1. Refer students to the Food Pyramid Chart focusing on the stairs.  Review with students that the stairs signify the importance of exercise for a healthy body and how often you should exercise.
  2. Hand out 1 index card to each student.
  3. Have students write 1-2 things they do to keep moving (i.e., playing basketball, running, etc.)
  4. Collect the index cards.
  5. Have students get into a large circle.
  6. Tell students they will all be acting out movements that they have written on their cards.
  7. Have student who wrote a specific movement on the card act it out for the rest of the class.  Ready, set, go!  (For 15 seconds have entire class act out the movement.)
  8. Repeat #7 using other suggestions on the cards.
  9.  Review what the students have learned from this lesson, such as how often they should exercise, what kind of exercise they can do, and what new activity did they learn to do that they never tried before.

~Lesson 9

LESSON 9:  Design Your Own Food Pyramid

Objective:  Students will design their own food pyramid.

                                   

Materials:

 

 

Procedure:

  1. Refer students to Food Pyramid Chart Poster (which should be displayed on the classroom wall).  Tell students that they will be designing their own food pyramids using posterboard and pictures of  food from grocery store ads.
  2. Hand out students directions along with rubric.
  3. Read directions to students and tell them they need to refer to the rubric to be sure the entire project is completed.
  4. Once project is completed, have students share posters.
  5. Discuss with students any questions they still have about the food pyramid (i.e., Was there a food you were unsure about?  Any food that you thought might go into 2 different groups?, etc.)

 

 

 

~Lesson 9

“Designing your own Food Pyramid Poster”

Directions:

  1. Make an outline of the Food Pyramid on your poster.  Be sure to make it large enough to cover most of the poster.
  2. Label the food pyramid by writing all the food group names on the bottom of your poster.
  3. Using supermarket ads, find foods that are in each of the food groups.
  4. Cut the food pictures out and glue them on the poster in the correct food group.
  5. Be sure your work is neat.  Use the rubric to check your work.
  6. Have fun!

   Student Name________________        Grade___________

RUBRIC

SUPER                            GOOD                                    POOR       

 

Poster is complete;                  Poster is almost complete;        LESS THAN 1/2

there are pictures from           there are pictures from           of the  poster

ALL food groups                      MOST food groups                   is complete

                                                                       

                                                              

Poster is neat                         Poster is fairly neat                 Poster is

                                                                                          Sloppy

 

 

Food groups are labeled            Most food groups                    Food groups

Correctly                                 labeled correctly                    NOT labeled

                                                                                          correctly

 

 

 

~Lesson 10

 

LESSON 10:  Foods Around the World

                 

Objectives: 

 

Materials:

 

 

Procedure:

 

  1. Start the lesson off by asking students their nationality or where they were born.   Have they ever lived in another country?  Have their parents lived in another country?  If so, ask the student what kind of food they eat (for breakfast, lunch, or dinner). 
  2. Explain to students that people from different countries often eat different types of food to meet their nutritional needs.  Futher explain that everyone does not need to eat the same thing in order to eat healthy.  There are lots of choices!
  3. Tell students they will be working on a project  and they will be researching different countries and the foods that are typically eaten in that country.
  4. Hand out project worksheet and break the students up into groups of 4.
  5. Students complete project (this can span over several days).

Closure:  Students share their projects, what they found out, and explain how what the people eat in one country differs from their own country.

~Lesson 10

Name:________________________

 

 

Foods Around the World

Research Project

 

Directions:

 

  1. With your group choose a country that you would like to research.
  2. Using books from the library or the Internet you need to find the following information:
  3. Once you have your information you will design a poster displaying this information.  Be sure to include the name of the country, pictures of foods eaten in that country.  You will also include a written paragraph explaining what you found out.  In the paragraph tell us foods they grow, where people get their food, and what foods they eat for different meals.  You can even put in  sample meals. 
  4. Make your poster colorful and creative.
  5. Use the Rubric to make sure you have all the information needed on your poster.
  6. Share your poster with the class.

 

 

 

 

~Lesson 10

 

 

 

RUBRIC

 

Foods Around the World Project

 

 

SUPER

GOOD

POOR

Includes country and many foods eaten in that country

 

 

 

 

Includes country and some foods eaten in that country

Includes country but very little food in that country

Poster has pictures

 

 

Poster has some pictures

Poster has no pictures

Paragraph is complete and correct

 

 

Paragraph is partially complete and correct

Paragraph is not done

Work is neat

 

Work is somewhat neat

Work is sloppy

 

 

Student’s Name______________________________

 

Grade_________________

 

Comments/Notes:_______________________________________________________  _

 

 

                                                                                                                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

~Lesson 11

 

LESSON 11:  International Day

 

**This lesson requires work.  You may want to enlist some parents or volunteers if you will be preparing the food in class.  You may also make this a home/school project and have the students prepare the food at home.

 

Objective:

 

 

Materials:

 

Procedure:

 

  1. Tell students they will be having an International Day.  Students will be making a food from the country they studied and share it with the class.
  2. Have students work with their group to find a recipe (either in the recipe books or internet) that they would like to make.
  3. You can have either the students make the food at home or bring in the food and make it in class, if possible.
  4. Give students a nutrition chart for them to complete.
  5. Set up the classroom  by posting labels for the countries and displaying the food in the appropriate section.
  6. Students sample the food.
  7. Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

~Lesson 11

 

Name__________________________

 

Date___________________

 

Country Studied_________________________

 

 

Directions:  Using the ingredients used in the food you prepared, fill in the food groups that were used for this food. List the ingredients under the proper food group.

 

Food Prepared______________________________

 

FRUITS/VEGETABLES

GRAINS

MEATS & BEANS

MILK

FATS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is this food you prepared a healthy dish?______________________

 

How do you know? _______________________________________________________

           

 

________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name:_____________________________    Date_________________________

 

Post Assessment

 

Food Pyramid Questionnaire

 

1.  Draw a circle around the foods that are in the GRAIN GROUP.

 

2.  Draw a rectangle around the foods that are in the VEGETABLE GROUP.

 

3.  Draw a square around the foods that are in the FRUIT GROUP.

 

4.  Draw a triangle around the foods that are in the MILK GROUP.

 

5.  Draw an oval around the foods that are in the MEAT and BEANS GROUP.

 

                        

 

 

5.0.2                              5.0.2

 

 

              LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01                        

 

                                                 

 

 

 

Post-Assessment

(continued)

 

 

 

 

1.  What is the Food Pyramid?

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

2.  List 2-3 foods that are made up of carbohydrates.

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

 

3.  List 2-3 foods that are made up of protein. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

4.  List 2-3 foods that are made up of fats.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

5.  Why is it important for your body to eat healthy foods?

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

~Lesson 13

 

 

 

 

CULMINATING ACTIVITY

 

 

As a culminating activity to this unit have students prepare  full day’s menu which includes breakfast, lunch, and dinner.  Be sure to emphasize that students should use information they learned about what their bodies need in order to survive.  Tell students they can use the Food Pyramid Guide s a reference.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                ~Lesson 13

Culminating Activity

 

 

One Day Meal Plan

 

Write in your choices for a health breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snack.  Refer to the Food Pyramid Guide to be sure you are getting the correct amount of nutrients (grains, vegetables, fruits, milk, and meats & beans in your meal plan for the day,

 

 

 

BREAKFAST

 

 

 

 

 

 

LUNCH

 

 

 

 

 

 

SNACK

 

 

DINNER

 

 

 

 

 

 

SNACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Student’s Name______________________________

 

Date_________________

 

 

 

Unit Assessment

“Nutrition”

 

Goals

Shows

understanding

Needs support

Does not grasp

concept

  • Can list the 5 basic food groups
  • Understands that nutritional needs can be met by a variety of different foods

 

 

 

  • Can identify if a food comes from plant or animal

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTES/COMMENTS:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

 

Final assessment/Cumulative grade:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extension Activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Literature Connections:

 

Gregory the Terrible Eater by Mitchell Sharmat

 

Walter the Lazy Mouse  by Marjorie Flack

 

Eating the Alphabet:  Fruits and Vegetables from A to Z by Lois Ehlert

 

Pancakes for Breakfast by Tomie dePaola

 

The Race Against Junk Food by Anthony Buono, Roy Nemerson & Brian Silberman

 

How to Teach Nutrition to Kids by Connie Evers

 

Five Kids and a Monkey Solve the Great Cupcake Caper:  A Learning Adventure About Nutrition and Exercise by Nina Riccio

 

The Monster Health Book:  A Guide to Eating Healthy, Being Active, and Feeling Great for Monsters and Kids by Edward Miller

 

 

Web Sites:

 

www.thegrowingconnection.org

 

www.kidsgardening.com

 

www.teamnutrition.usda.gov

 

http://www.eduref.org

 

www.learntobehealthy.org

 

www.dole5aday.com