Science

First Grade

Unit 1

COMPARE AND MEASURE

 

INTRODUCTION

Comparing and measuring is not only an essential life skill but a natural way for us to explore the world we live in.  In Comparing and Measuring unit students will describe and understand such properties as length, volume, weight and temperature.  In this unit students will become aware standard and non standard measurement and practice measuring using both. This unit directly aligns with mandated science and math skills. 

 

SCIENCE STANDARDS AND INDICATORS

Conceptual Theme: Science and technology in Society- How do science and technology affect the quality of our lives?

 

Content Standard 1.4: The properties of materials and organisms can be described more accurately through the use of standard measuring.

 

Core Science Inquiry Expected Performances:

AINQ.2 Use senses and simple measuring tools to collect data

AINQ.7 Use standard tools to measure and describe physical properties such as weight,

               length and temperature

AINQ.8 Use nonstandard measures to estimate and compare the sizes of objects

 

CMT Expected Performance A17- Estimate, measure and compare the sizes and weighs of different objects and organisms using standard and nonstandard measuring tools.

 

Grade Level Concept: Various tools can be used to measure, describe and compare different objects and organisms.

 

SCIENCE INQUIRY: Scientific inquiry is a thoughtful and coordinated attempt to search out describe, explain and predict natural phenomena.

 

SCIENCE LITERACY: Science literacy includes speaking listening, presenting, interpreting, reading and writing about science.

 

SCIENCE NUMERACY: Mathematics provides useful tool for the description, analysis and presentation of scientific data and ideas.

 

BIG IDEA

Various tools can be used to measure, describe, and compare different objects and organisms.

 

ALIGNMENT TO OTHER STANDARDS

MATH

3.3b2 - Use estimation physical referents and non standard units to sort and compare objects

3.3c1- Explore using the standard units if inch and centimeter to estimate and measure length

3.3b3- Explore using measurement tools such ad thermometers, basic rulers and balance scales to measure temperature, length and weight.

 

Key Science Vocabulary: centimeter, meter, gram, kilogram, milliliter, liter, graduated cylinder, thermometer, Celsius, Fahrenheit


 

SCIENCE CONTENT STANDARD 1.4

CONCEPTUAL THEME:

Science and Technology
in Society - How do science and technology affect the quality of our lives?

 

CONTENT STANDARD:

1.4 – The properties of materials and organisms can be described more accurately through the use of standard measuring units.

 

 

GRADE-LEVEL CONCEPT: u Various tools can be used to measure, describe and compare different objects and organisms.

GRADE-LEVEL EXPECTATIONS:

1.     Observations can be expressed in words, pictures or numbers.  Measurements add accuracy to observations.

2.     Objects and organisms can be described using nonstandard measurement units, such as hand-lengths, pencil-lengths, handfuls, etc.

3.     Standard measurement units are more accurate than nonstandard units because they have consistent values agreed on by everyone.  For example, “My caterpillar is one finger long” is much less accurate than “My caterpillar is 4 centimeters long.”

4.     Scientists and nonscientists all over the world use the metric system of measurement.  In the United States, the customary measurement system is used in daily life.  Equivalent values between the two systems can be estimated (for example, 1 inch is a little more than 2 centimeters).

5.     Specific tools are used to measure different quantities:

a.      Metric rulers are used to measure length, height or distance in centimeters and meters; customary rulers measure length, height or distance in inches, feet or yards.

b.     Balances and scales are used to compare and measure the heaviness of objects.  Grams and kilograms are units that express mass; ounces and pounds are units that express weight.

c.      Graduated cylinders, beakers and measuring cups are tools used to measure the volume of liquids.  Volume can be expressed in milliliters (mL), liters (L), cups or ounces.

d.     Thermometers are tools used to measure temperature; thermometers can indicate temperature in degrees Celsius or degrees Fahrenheit, or both.

KEY SCIENCE VOCABULARY:  centimeter, meter, gram, kilogram, milliliter, liter, graduated cylinder, thermometer, Celsius, Fahrenheit

CMT EXPECTED PERFORMANCES

 

A17

Estimate, measure and compare the sizes and weights of different objects and organisms using standard and nonstandard measuring tools.

 

ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE:

 

 

 

CONCEPTS

 

SKILLS: Students will be able to do:

 

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS TO GUIDE INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT:

 

MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES

 

 

 


 

 

 

OBJECTIVES AND GOALS

LESSON ONE

Compare how we are alike and Different

 

LESSON TWO

Let’s Make Body Cutouts

 

LESSON THREE

Matching Our Heights

 

                                          

 

LESSON FOUR

Matching Length of Arms and Legs

 

LESSON FIVE

Comparing Objects

 

LESSON SIX

Matching Distance

 

LESSON SEVEN

Using Our Feet to Measure

 

LESSON EIGHT

Using Different Standard Units of Measure

 

LESSON NINE

Measuring with a Standard Units

 

LESSON TEN

Exploring with Unifix Cubes

 

LESSON ELEVEN

Counting Large Numbers of Unit

 

LESSON TWELVE

Measuring the Height of the Teacher

 

LESSON THIRTEEN

Making a Measuring Strip

 

LESSON FOURTEEN

Making a Measuring Tape

 

 

 

 

LESSON FIFTEEN

Making a Measuring Tape

 

LESSON SIXTEEN

Using a Measuring Tape to Measure Distance

 

Significant Task

 Post‑Unit Assessment

 

Overview

This post‑unit assessment is matched to the pre‑unit assessment in Lesson 1. By comparing the individual and class responses from these activities with those from Lesson 1, you will be able to document and assess students' learning over the course of the unit. During the first lesson, students drew themselves and a partner and wrote about the ways they were alike and different.  They also developed two class lists entitled "What We Know about Comparing and Measuring" and "Ways We Are Alike and Different." When they revisit these activities during the post‑unit assessment, students are likely to appreciate how much they have learned about comparing and measuring.

 

Materials

FOR EACH STUDENT

1 copy of Record Sheet 1‑A: Looking at My Partner and Me (on pg. 21)

1 package of crayons, including one red crayon and one blue crayon

 

FOR EVERY TWO STUDENTS

1 resealable plastic bag for collecting materials, 23 x 30 cm (9 x 12 In)

 

FOR THE CLASS

2 sheets of newsprint

Class lists from Lesson 1: "What We Know about Comparing and Measuring" and "Ways We Are Alike and Different"

1,500 Unfix Cubes", separated by color

1 container of each of the following:

100 wood coffee stirrers

100 unsharpened pencils

100 plastic spoons

100 toothpicks

100 small wood spools, 4 cm (1.5 in)

15  rolls of adding machine tape

Crayons

 

Preparation

1. Label one sheet of newsprint "What We Know about Comparing and

     Measuring" and label the other "Ways We Are Alike and Different." Date the

     sheets and post them in the classroom.

2. Set up the distribution center in your classroom as you did in Lesson 1.

3. Pair students with the same partners they had in Lesson 1.

4. Copy Record Sheet 1‑A: Looking at My Partner and Me for each student.

 

Procedure

1. Ask students to think about what they know about comparing and measuring.

    After a few minutes, have them share their thoughts with the class. Record these

    Thoughts on the "What We Know about Comparing and Measuring" chart. To help

    stimulate student discussion; you may want to ask questions such as the following:

·    When have you compared before?

·    When have you measured before?

·    How did you compare?

·    How did you measure?            

·    Why were you comparing?

·    Why were you measuring?      

 

2. Let students know you would like partners to decide on one way they are like

    each other and one way they are different from each other.  Invite

    students to use any materials in the classroom or distribution center to help them

    find out about their partners.   

 

3. After a few moments, ask students to share their thoughts. To encourage

discussion, ask the class questions such as the following:

·    What way are you and your partner alike?

·    How are you and your partner different?

·    Did you use any materials from the distribution center to help make your

            comparisons?

·    How did these materials help you make comparisons?

 

 4. Record students' thoughts on the "Ways We Are Alike and Different" chart.

 5. Ask students to share how they obtained their information. Then display the

    original lists from Lesson 1. Here are some ways to use the lists to assess student

    progress:

·    Ask students to identify statements they now know to be true.

·    What experiences during the unit helped them confirm these statements?

·    Asking questions such as "How do you know that?" and "What happened next?" may be helpful.

·    Ask students to correct or improve statements and give reasons for their corrections.

·    Ask students to point out information on their new lists that is not on the original ones.

 

 6. Pass out and review Record Sheet 1‑A: Looking at My Partner and Me. Then ask      students to do the following:

·    Write your name and today's date.

·    Draw a picture of yourself and your partner.

·    Write your partner's name in the box with his or her picture.

·    Draw a red circle around the part of the picture that shows one way you and

     your partner are alike.

·    Draw a blue circle around the part of the picture that shows one way you and

     your partner are different.

·    Write one or two sentences describing each likeness and difference.

 

    7. On the chalkboard, you may want to write sentence starters such as the following:

·    I am like my partner because

·    One way I am different from my partner is

·    My partner and I

 

     8. Invite students to share their drawings with the class.

 

     9. Collect the record sheets and have the students return their materials to the

         distribution center.

 

   10. As you compare the class lists and record sheets from the post‑unit

         assessment with those from Lesson 1, note the following:

·    Do students' post‑unit observations show greater detail than those from Lesson 1?

·    Do students' post‑unit comparisons about likenesses and differences include measuring? For example, do students use Unifix Cubes" to find out the length of their partner's arms?

·    Do students choose standard units of measure? If so, which units do they choose?

·    When students measure, do they use beginning and ending points and a common starting line?

·    Do they label the units in their measurements?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RESOURCES

Web Sites

http://www.nyu.edu/pages/mathmol/textbook/statesofmatter.html

http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-12/airplane/state.html

http://www.usoe.k12.ut.us/curr/science/sciber00/7th/matter/sciber/intro.htm

http://www.chem4kids.com/files/matter_intro.html

http://www.nyu.edu/pages/mathmol/textbook/4gradecover.html

http://www.mcwdn.org/Physics/Matter.html

http://www.sci.tamucc.edu/~eyoung/measureliterature.html

http://www.aaamath.com/mea.html

http://convertplus.com/en/

http://www.sciencemadesimple.com/conversions.html

http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/characteristics.html

http://www.apples4theteacher.com/measure.html

http://www.quiz-tree.com/Units_of_Measurement_main.html

 

 

Literacy Books

Let’s Measure with Tools; Christine N. Casteel (Big Book)

Once I Was Very Small; Elizabeth Ferber

The Biggest; Nicole Irving

Inch by Inch; Leo Lionni

How Big Were the Dinosaurs?; Bernard Most

How Big Is a Foot; Rolf Myller

How Much Is a Million? David Schwartz

People; Peter Spier

A Big Fish Story; Joanne Wylie

Actual Size, Jenkins

Actual Size; Jenkins,

A House for Hermit Crab; Carle,

Alley Oop!; Mayer  

A Pig is Big; Florian,  

Armadillo Rodeo; Brett,

 Block City; Stevenson

Carrie Measures Up; Aber

Come Away From the Water; Burningham & Cape

Counting on Frank; Clement

Fannie in the Kitchen; Hopkinson

Farmer Mack Measures His Pig; Johnston

Fish Fry Tonight; Koller

How Big is a Foot?: Myller

How Tall, How Short; How Far Away; Adler

 How to Weigh an Elephant; Barner

The 100-Pound Problem; Dussling

 If You Hopped Like a Frog; Schwartz

 Inch by Inch; Lionni

Inchworm and a Half: Pinczes

Is the Blue Whale the Biggest Thing There Is?; Wells

Jack & the Beanstalk; Briggs

Just a Little Bit; Tompert

Keep Your Distance; Herman

Long, Short, High, Low, Thin, Wide; Fey

Lulu's Lemonade; Derubertis

 

Extension Act ivies

Relay Race; Have an outdoor relay race measuring the distance of each relay

Long Jump: Compare long jump height with distance you have jumped. Graph the correlations

 

Field Trips:

Dinosaur State Park; Compare Dinosaur foot prints with others animals prints

Peabody Museum; Measure how many students’ bodies laying head to toes equal the length of the Dinosaur.

 

Links to United Streaming

For this unit, go to http://www.unitedstreaming.com

Search strand:  Measurement